Healthful Living

Grades K - 2

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Grades 6 - 8 Grades 9 - 12

Games and Activities

 

Healthful Living

Grades K-2


Healthful Living: Grades K-2


 

Personal Health and Wellness

 

Domain Description: Personal Health and Wellness is influenced by individual heredity and involves a lifelong process of choices and behaviors that lead to healthful living and disease prevention.

 

Standard 1: The student will understand the role of personal hygiene practices as related to healthful living.

 

Learning Expectations:

The student will:

1.1 demonstrate appropriate personal hygiene practices;   http://www.kidshealth.org/kid/talk/qa/wash_hands.html

1.2 identify the effects of poor personal hygiene practices.

http://www.kidshealth.org/kid/talk/qa/germs.html

 

Performance Indicators:

At Level 1, the student will be able to:

  • Identify proper hygiene skills (e.g. handwashing, shampooing, flossing, toothbrushing, and bathing);
  • Identify basic signs and symptoms of head lice.

At Level 2, the student will be able to:

  • Apply proper hygiene practices (e.g. handwashing, shampooing, flossing, toothbrushing, bathing);
  • Identify consequences of poor oral hygiene (e.g. cavities, gum disease, and tooth loss);
  • Identify consequences of poor personal hygiene (e.g. body odor, illness, and poor self image);
  • Practice prevention of head lice.

At Level 3, the student will be able to:

  • Demonstrate proper hygiene practices;
  • Explain the importance of proper hygiene practices;
  • Identify signs and symptoms of head lice.

 

Teacher Assessment Indicators (examples):

The teacher may:

  • apply cooking oil and ground cinnamon to the students’ hands. Students rub their own hands together, see the sediment and think it is dirt, wash hands as normally do. Observe that oil and cinnamon are still evident. Students then apply soap and use proper handwashing techniques as taught by the teacher;
  • provide a dental mold for students to demonstrate proper toothbrushing techniques (invite dental professional if needed);
  • have the students demonstrate the practices of prevention of head lice (e.g. not sharing mats, hats, combs, and headphones).

 

Curriculum Integration:

N/A

 

 Standard 2: The student will understand the role of body systems as related to healthful living.

 

Learning Expectations:

The student will:

2.1 identify the basic body structure;

http://www.bbc.co.uk/northernireland/schools/4_11/tykids/index.shtml

http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/podsmission/bones/

2.2 identify the functions of the human body systems;

http://www.brainpop.com/health/cellsandbodybasics/humanbody/

http://www.kidshealth.org/kid/closet/movies/how_the_body_works_interim.html

2.3 explain the importance of the basic body systems.

http://www.kidshealth.org/kid/closet/movies/how_the_body_works_interim.html

 

Performance Indicators:

At Level 1, the student will be able to:

  • name the basic body parts;
  • identify the location of basic body parts.

At Level 2, the student will be able to:

  • describe the functions of the basic body organs (e.g. heart, lungs, brain, stomach, ribs);
  • name the basic body systems (e.g. cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, nerves, muscular, circulatory and skin);
  • identify and discuss the location of basic body systems.

At Level 3, the student will be able to:

  • arrange basic body parts in proper location;
  • explain the functions of basic body systems.

 

Teacher Assessment Indicators (examples):

The teacher may:

  • have the students trace each other’s body on butcher paper and label the body parts;
  • draw the digestive system with sidewalk chalk on concrete and simulate digestive process. Using an apple, have the students walk through digestive system and talk about what each part of the system does to the apple;
  • provide a puzzle for students to assemble depicting body parts.

 

 

 

Curriculum Integration:

Life Science 1.1, 1.2, 4.1, 4.2, 4.3; Physical Education 4.1, 4.2; Visual Arts 1.0; Earth Science 14.2.

 

Standard 3: The student will understand the relationship of physical activity as it relates to healthful living.

 

Learning Expectations:

The student will:

3.1 describe the importance of daily physical activity and rest;

http://www.kidshealth.org/kid/exercise/fit/work_it_out.html

http://www.brainpop.com/health/personalhealth/fitness/

3.2 identify physical activities used in daily life that promote healthful living.

http://www.getfittn.com/docs/kidsexercisepyramid.jpg

http://www.getfittn.com/docs/adultexercisepyramid.jpg

 

Performance Indicators:

At Level 1, the student will be able to:

  • name different types of daily physical activities (e.g. walking, running, jumping, rollerblading, swimming, biking, dancing, climbing, sports);
  • describe the importance of adequate rest to healthful living.

At Level 2, the student will be able to:

  • describe the importance of daily physical activity;
  • describe how adequate rest contributes to healthy living;
  • list various types of physically active leisure time activities (e.g. walking, swimming, golfing, tennis, dancing, hiking, climbing, and biking).

At Level 3, the student will be able to:

  • compare active and non-active leisure time activities (e.g. benefits of choosing to walk with family instead of watching television).

 

Teacher Assessment Indicators (examples):

The teacher may:

  • assist the students in counting their heartbeat at rest for 10 seconds. Then have the students perform 10 jumping jacks and count their heartbeat for 10 seconds. Notice the increase in heartbeat;
  • have students keep a weekly log of physical activity;
  • provide pictures from magazines for students to cut out and create a classroom poster to compare active and non-active leisure time activities.

 

Curriculum Integration:

Physical Education 1.1-1.11, 2.1-2.6, 4.2, 4.3, 4.4, 5.2; Social Studies 1.01, 1.03


 

 

 

 

Nutrition

 

Domain Description: Proper nutrition is essential for maintaining a healthy lifestyle. Healthful nutrition helps to prevent chronic diseases such as diabetes, cancer, and cardiovascular disease. Using the Food Guide Pyramid can provide guidelines for healthy eating. It is important to balance food intake and physical activity to promote healthful living.

 

Standard 4: The student will understand the relationship of nutrition to healthful living.

 

Learning Expectations:

The student will:

4.1 identify the basic food groups and foods;

http://teamnutrition.usda.gov/Resources/mpk_poster.pdf

http://www.brainpop.com/health/personalhealth/nutrition/

4.2 identify food as a source of energy and growth;

http://www.kidshealth.org/kid/nutrition/food/sports.html

4.3 describe the importance of healthy meals and snacks.

http://www.kidshealth.org/kid/nutrition/food/snack_attack.html

 

Performance Indicators:

At Level 1, the student will be able to:

  • name various foods;
  • name the five basic food groups.

At Level 2, the student will be able to:

  • describe the food pyramid;
  • describe where various foods come from (e.g. food sources: cows, plants);
  • identify healthy food choices;
  • describe the importance of eating a variety of healthy foods;
  • discuss the importance of food as fuel for the body;
  • explain why eating breakfast is important to healthy living;
  • identify the benefits of eating "Five-A-Day";
  • identify the proper serving size.

At Level 3, the student will be able to:

  • categorize various foods into the five basic food groups;
  • describe the use of the food guide pyramid for healthy eating practices;
  • taste and compare various types of ethnic foods.

 

Teacher Assessment Indicators (examples):

The teacher may:

  • provide an enlarged food pyramid and various foods for each food group. Have the students take pictures and Velcro to appropriate area on food pyramid;
  • assist students in clipping out pictures of foods and pasting them onto a paper plate to create a balanced meal;
  • use grocery store flyers to encourage students to identify (circle) nutritious meals.

 

Curriculum Integration:

Life Science 3.1, 3.2; Math 3.1.1-3.1.9; English/Language Arts K.2.08; Social Studies 1.01.


Family Life

 

Domain Description: The dynamic process of growth and development encompasses physical, mental, emotional, and social maturation. Positive personal and family relationships provide a foundation that promotes healthy development. (Refer to TCA 49-6-1303 with regard to children excused from family life instruction by parent or guardian).

 

Standard 5: The student will understand the contributions of family relationships to healthful living.

 

Learning Expectations:

The student will:

5.1 describe the various types of family structures;

           http://www.kidshealth.org/kid/feeling/home_family/blended.html
           http://www.kidshealth.org/kid/feeling/home_family/adoption.html
           http://www.kidshealth.org/kid/feeling/home_family/new_baby.html
           http://www.kidshealth.org/kid/feeling/home_family/foster_families.html

5.2 explain that family structures vary and can change;

A Kid's Guide to Divorce

http://www.cyh.com/HealthTopics/HealthTopicDetailsKids.aspx?p=335&np=282&id=2398

5.3 identify common goals and values found in family structures;

http://life.familyeducation.com/values/morality/29482.html?detoured=1

5.4 identify ways children can contribute to healthy family life.

       Helping at Home
 

Performance Indicators:

At Level 1, the student will be able to:

  • describe his/her family.

At Level 2, the student will be able to:

  • distinguish between the different types of families (e.g. two parent, single parent, blended, extended, foster, and adoptive);
  • identify how family structures can change (e.g. birth, death, divorce, and re-marriage);
  • describe the various basic family values (e.g. integrity, love, trust, and nurturing);
  • explain basic care given by caregivers (e.g. safety, nourishment, shelter, and clothing);
  • identify ways that all family members are responsible for contributing to healthy family living.

At Level 3, the student will be able to:

  • explain how the different types of families meet the needs of its members.

 

Teacher Assessment Indicators (examples):

The teacher may:

  • aid students in drawing or cutting out pictures to represent family members and have him/her discuss family members;
  • have students tell about their special chores that they do around the house and how this helps meet needs in their family;
  • encourage students to orally describe how a family member cares for him/her.

 

Curriculum Integration:

Physical Education 3.4, 3.6; English/Language Arts K.1.10a, 1.1.10a, 2.1.10a; Visual Art 1.3.

 

Standard 6: The student will understand the stages of human growth and development.

 

Learning Expectations:

The student will:

6.1 identify human growth and development stages throughout the life cycle;

http://www.brainpop.com/health/growthdevelopmentandgenetics/growth/

http://www.brainpop.com/health/growthdevelopmentandgenetics/adolescence/

6.2 describe the important differences in the stages of human growth and development.

http://www.brainpop.com/health/growthdevelopmentandgenetics/

http://www.brainpop.com/health/growthdevelopmentandgenetics/infancy/

http://www.kidshealth.org/kid/grow/body_stuff/growing_up_normal.html

 

Performance Indicators:

At Level 1, the student will be able to:

  • name different stages of development (e.g. babies, children, teenagers, adults, and elderly).

At Level 2, the student will be able to:

  • describe how babies are different from children;
  • describe how children are different from teenagers;
  • describe how children are different from adults;
  • describe how children are different from the elderly.

At Level 3, the student will be able to:

  • illustrate how an individual will grow and develop throughout his/her life.

 

 

Teacher Assessment Indicators (examples):

The teacher may:

  • create a role play situation for students to act out different stages of life;
  • provide various pictures or items for students to match to the appropriate stage of life;
  • have students create a pictorial timeline from birth to present and draw a picture of what they think he/she might look like as a teenager.

 

Curriculum Integration:

Life Science 4.1, 4.2, 4.3, 5.1, 5.2; Math 2.1, 2.5, 3.2.3, 3.2.7, 3.2.8; Visual Art 1.3.

 

Standard 7: The student will understand the need and process of setting personal goals and standards for healthful living.

 

Learning Expectations:

The student will:

7.1 identify personal goals and standards;

 

7.2 describe the importance of personal decision making to healthful living.

 

Performance Indicators:

At Level 1, the student will be able to:

  • define goals and standards;
  • identify appropriate healthy living behavior that would affect his/her future.

At Level 2, the student will be able to:

  • define goal setting as related to healthy living;
  • select standards for healthy living that help them reach personal goals;
  • describe how appropriate decision making can lead to healthy living;
  • describe the difference between wants and needs.

At Level 3, the student will be able to:

  • create personal goals and standards;
  • classify wants and needs.

 

Teacher Assessment Indicators (examples):

The teacher may:

  • have the students state a personal goal;
  • have the students develop a short and/or long-term goal (e.g. behavior, schoolwork, chores, and fitness);
  • use a classroom chart to have students compare basic wants and needs.

 

Curriculum Integration:

Physical Education 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 3.6; Social Studies 4.03, 4.04.

 

 

 


Emotional, Social, and Mental Health

 

Domain Description: Emotional, social, and mental health is dependent upon a healthy self-concept and communicating needs, wants, and feelings in a healthy manner. Conflict resolution, anger management, and stress management provide skills for healthful living.

 

Standard 8: The student will understand the importance of positive self-concept and interpersonal relationships for healthful living.

 

Learning Expectations:

The student will:

8.1 explain that feelings can be expressed in different ways;

http://www.kidshealth.org/kid/feeling/index.html

8.2 name and describe qualities and characteristics that make all individuals unique;

Kids, It's OK to be Different

8.3 identify the importance of developing and maintaining healthy relationships.

Healthy Relationships

 

Performance Indicators:

At Level 1, the student will be able to:

  • identify feelings;
  • identify methods of expression (e.g. laughing, crying, smiling, hugging and yelling);
  • identify appropriate ways to associate with individuals who have disabilities;
  • describe verbal and non-verbal communication skills.

At Level 2, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate methods of expression;
  • demonstrate appropriate manners;
  • demonstrate verbal and nonverbal communication;
  • define self-concept;
  • describe appropriate ways to manage emotions;
  • identify health impairments and physical disabilities;
  • demonstrate respect for individuals who have disabilities;
  • define a value;
  • identify qualities of a good friend.

At Level 3, the student will beKids, It's OK to be Different able to:

  • describe how positive self-concept makes an individual unique;
  • describe the challenges of living with a health impairment or physical disability;
  • explain the importance of having personal values.

 

 

Teacher Assessment Indicators (examples):

The teacher may:

  • have the students list positive things about themselves and/or classmates;
  • provide a game for students to match emotions to facial expressions;
  • use role play scenarios to simulate obstacles a special needs child might face (e.g. blind fold, wheelchair, etc.) and have students identify their feelings.

 

Curriculum Integration:

Physical Education 3.1-3.6, 4.5, 5.1, 5.3, 5.4, 5.5, Visual Art 2.4.

 

Standard 9: The student will understand how positive social, emotional, and mental health practices promote healthful living.

 

Learning Expectations:

The student will:

9.1 identify how attitudes and behaviors relate to social health;

http://life.familyeducation.com/social-and-emotional-problems/health/34459.html

9.2 describe healthy ways to deal with pleasant and unpleasant situations for emotional well-being;

Bullying - Resources for Kids

9.3 describe how feelings and behaviors relate to personal mental health.

Positive Power Kids™

 

Performance Indicators:

At Level 1, the student will be able to:

  • define a rule for positive social living;
  • identify the characteristics of a bully;
  • describe divorce and the ending of relationships;
  • define death.

At Level 2, the student will be able to:

  • list and explain the importance of rules for positive social living (e.g. school, home, and classroom);
  • describe the importance of group needs in relation to individual needs;
  • describe appropriate actions to take when confronted by a bully;
  • describe the feelings related to divorce and the ending of a relationship;
  • identify the difference between death and dying;
  • identify the feelings related to death;
  • identify the various ways that people grieve;
  • describe the appropriate way to relate to someone who is going through the grieving process;
  • describe ways to manage emotions responsibly;
  • express the importance of not feeling sad for long periods of time;
  • identify responsible people to report and discuss feelings of sadness;
  • identify healthy ways of dealing with anger.

 

At Level 3, the student will be able to:

  • describe and demonstrate how following rules helps to promote fairness;
  • create and explain a role play of a bullying situation.

 

Teacher Assessment Indicators (examples):

The teacher may:

  • have the students begin the day by sharing an example of one positive thing that can be said about another person every day for one week;
  • aid the students in drawing a picture illustrating how individuals may look as they experience different feelings (e.g. when feeling happy, someone looks like...);
  • assist students in creating and explaining a role play situation where bullying is involved.

 

Curriculum Integration:

Physical Education 2.4, 3.1-3.7, 5.5; Visual Art 2.6; English/Language Art K.2.07b K.2.09b, 1.2.09b, 2.2.09c,d, Computer Technology 2.1.

 


Disease Prevention and Control

 

Domain Description: Disease prevention is greatly influenced by health enhancing knowledge and behaviors practiced throughout life.

 

Standard 10: The student will understand attitudes and behaviors for preventing and controlling disease.

 

Learning Expectations:

The student will:

10.1 identify how germs are spread;

http://www.kidshealth.org/kid/talk/qa/germs.html

10.2 identify habits that will promote disease prevention;

http://www.brainpop.com/health/immunesystem/immunesystem/

10.3 identify chronic health problems.

       http://www.kidshealth.org/kid/health_problems/index.html

 

Performance Indicators:

At Level 1, the student will be able to:

  • define germs.

At Level 2, the student will be able to:

  • describe how germs are transmitted;
  • illustrate proper handwashing techniques;
  • explain why proper handwashing is important;
  • describe the value of good health habits such as adequate sleep, exercise, water, and proper nutrition as related to disease control;
  • identify the importance of regular health screenings (e.g. medical, vision, hearing, and dental) as related to disease prevention;
  • explain the importance of immunizations;
  • identify and describe common communicable diseases (e.g. HIV, hepatitis, flu, pink eye and head lice);
  • list universal precautions related to common communicable diseases (e.g. hand washing and avoiding direct contact with blood);
  • identify chronic diseases (e.g. asthma and diabetes).

At Level 3, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate universal precautions related to common communicable diseases;
  • identify health care practices that prevent illness and maintain health/wellness.

 

Teacher Assessment Indicators (examples):

The teacher may:

  • provide a paper plate for students to draw a face and tape a tissue over the nose to illustrate a good way to prevent spreading germs. Teach this saying to the students "If you sneeze, use me please";
  • schedule a dental hygienist guest speaker to demonstrate proper oral care techniques and administer fluoride treatments;
  • aid the students in drawing a picture of themselves practicing a proper health care technique.

 

Curriculum Integration:

Life Science 1.1, 1.2, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 4.1, 4.2; Physical Education 4.1, 4.2, 4.3; Math 3.5.1-3.5.8


 

Injury Prevention and Safety

 

Domain Description: According to All About Risk Watch "Every time a child is injured or killed by something that could have been prevented, everyone suffers - the child, his or her family, classmates and friends, and the entire community. For children ages 14 and under, the #1 health risk isn’t drugs or disease: its injury."

 

Standard 11: The learner will understand attitudes and behaviors for preventing accidents and injuries.

 

Learning Expectations:

The student will:

14.1 identify common causes of childhood accidents and injuries and methods of prevention;

           http://www.kidshealth.org/kid/watch/out/car_safety.html
           http://www.kidshealth.org/kid/watch/out/bike_safety.html
           http://www.kidshealth.org/kid/watch/out/sport_safety.html
           http://www.kidshealth.org/kid/feel_better/things/kidmedic.html
           http://www.kidshealth.org/kid/grow/drugs_alcohol/know_drugs.html

 

 

14.2 describe the importance of safety rules.

Welcome to McGruff.org

FAQ: Child Safety

 

Performance Indicators:

At Level 1, the student will be able to:

  • name the five senses and how they can contribute to personal safety (e.g. hearing smoke alarm, smelling smoke, seeing fire, etc);
  • identify behaviors that can lead to injury;
  • define the term poison.

At Level 2, the student will be able to:

  • identify safety rules related to leisure time activities (e.g. helmet and pad safety, seat belt safety, bus safety, sun safety, water safety, personal safety, etc);
  • describe various vehicle safety procedures (e.g. car, bus, and 4-wheelers).
  • identify poisonous household and nature products;
  • demonstrate ability to report possible poisoning;
  • state ways to prevent falls when playing (e.g. shoe tying, identifying safe and unsafe places to play);
  • tell a grown up when you find or see a gun.

At Level 3, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate various vehicle safety procedures;
  • explain why safety rules are needed.

 

Teacher Assessment Indicators (examples):

The teacher may:

  • have the students draw or list body parts that relate to the five senses and describe how they alert an individual to danger;
  • using a blindfold and tape recorder, have the students classify sounds as safe or unsafe;
  • have students demonstrate a role-play where a student will report a possible poisoning.

 

Curriculum Integration:

Physical Education 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 3.5, 3.6; Earth and Space Science 7.1, 14.1; Math 3.6.3, 3.6.6-3.6.9.

 

Standard 12: The student will understand appropriate care for injuries and sudden illness.

 

Learning Expectations:

The student will:

12.1 name and describe situations that should be reported to a responsible caregiver;

http://www.kidshealth.org/kid/feeling/emotion/handle_abuse.html

 

12.2 demonstrate basic first aid techniques.

http://www.brainpop.com/health/personalhealth/cpr/

http://www.brainpop.com/health/personalhealth/burns/

 

Performance Indicators:

At Level 1, the student will be able to:

  • identify situations that should be reported to responsible caregivers.

At Level 2, the student will be able to:

  • explain the purpose of the 911 telephone number;
  • demonstrate how to dial 911;
  • list situations that require 911 assistance;
  • describe first aid techniques for cuts, scrapes, nose bleeds, stings, animal bites, burns, and poisoning;
  • describe first aid techniques for recreational injuries (e.g. sprains, broken bones, head injuries);
  • identify situations where the use of universal precautions is needed;
  • describe the Heimlich maneuver.

At Level 3, the student will be able to:

  • create role play situations where 911 emergency assistance is required;
  • demonstrate the Heimlich maneuver.

 

Teacher Assessment Indicators (examples):

The teacher may:

  • provide a situation where students demonstrate dialing 911;
  • create a role play situation for students to act out what to do if his/her friend is bleeding (using ketchup) and have them respond with appropriate care;
  • schedule an Emergency Medical Technician guest speaker to demonstrate the Heimlich maneuver then have the students practice the technique on a pillow.

 

Curriculum Integration:

English/Language Arts K.1.03a

 

Standard 13: The student will understand the appropriate action to take when personal safety is threatened.

 

Learning Expectations:

The student will:

13.1 identify situations that should be reported to a trusted adult;

http://www.kidshealth.org/kid/feeling/emotion/handle_abuse.html

13.2 demonstrate self-protection skills and identify appropriate resources for help.

           http://www.kidshealth.org/kid/watch/er/fire_safety.html
 
 Performance Indicators:

At Level 1, the student will be able to:

  • identify trusted individuals.

At Level 2, the student will be able to:

  • name persons to whom threatening situations need to be reported;
  • describe the difference between good touch and bad touch;
  • identify situations of abuse and neglect (e.g. physical and mental harm, being left home alone, and lack of food);
  • identify appropriate self-protection skills;
  • describe appropriate procedures to take during a fire, tornado and earthquake;
  • demonstrate proper techniques of stop, drop, and roll.

At Level 3, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate appropriate self-protection skills;
  • demonstrate appropriate procedures to take during a fire, tornado, and earthquake.

 

Teacher Assessment Indicators (examples):

The teacher may:

  • have the students recite their full name, parents’ or caregivers’ full names, address, and phone number;
  • have the students demonstrate the "stop, drop, and roll" procedure;
  • assist the students in developing a fire escape plan for their home and present it to the class.

 

Curriculum Integration:

Physical Education 3.6; Computer Technology 2.1, 2.2.


 

Substance Use and Abuse

 

Domain Description: The use of chemical substances can have both benefits and risks. Knowledge, attitudes, and personal choices can determine responsible behaviors towards the use of chemical substances, including the avoidance of alcohol and tobacco.

 

Standard 14: The student will understand appropriate and inappropriate uses of chemical substances for healthful living.

 

Learning Expectations:

The student will:

14.1 describe the role of drugs and medicines in keeping people healthy;

Keep Kids Healthy - free pediatric parenting advice

14.2 describe inappropriate use of drugs and medicines.

http://www.brainpop.com/health/personalhealth/steroids/

http://www.brainpop.com/health/personalhealth/addiction/

http://www.brainpop.com/health/personalhealth/alcohol/

http://www.brainpop.com/health/personalhealth/drugabuse/

http://www.brainpop.com/health/personalhealth/smoking/

 

Performance Indicators:

At Level 1, the student will be able to:

  • define medications;
  • identify types of medications;
  • explain why medications should only be taken when administered by an adult.

At Level 2, the student will be able to:

  • describe the role of medications and how they contribute to healthful living;
  • identify the importance of not taking someone else’s medications (e.g. asthma inhaler, pills, and ointments).

At Level 3, the student will be able to:

  • identify medicines that bear a resemblance to candy.

 

Teacher Assessment Indicators (examples):

The teacher may:

  • have the students role play situations where they refuse candy and/or medications from a stranger or friend versus accepting candy and/or medications from a trusted adult;
  • conduct an art project by folding the ends of a piece of paper to the center to make a medicine cabinet. Have the students draw medicine containers on the inside of the medicine cabinet. When flaps are folded down, teacher provides a paper lock to secure with tape to outside of medicine cabinet to demonstrate lock up of all medicines. Teacher may write the words "Lock up all medications" on the outside of the medicine cabinet;
  • bring in pictures of various medicines and candies and have the students classify them correctly as either "Medicines" or "Candies" (e.g.Sweettarts to children’s vitamins, and Hershey’s candy bar to Ex-lax).

 

Curriculum Integration:

N/A

 

Standard 15: The student will understand the effects of substance use and abuse.

 

Learning Expectations:

The student will:

15.1identify the consequences of using tobacco products, alcohol, and drugs;

http://www.brainpop.com/health/personalhealth/smoking/

http://www.brainpop.com/health/personalhealth/alcohol/

http://www.brainpop.com/health/personalhealth/drugabuse/

           http://www.kidshealth.org/kid/watch/house/smoking.html
           http://www.kidshealth.org/kid/stay_healthy/body/alcohol.html

15.2 practice refusal skills to avoid harmful substances.

McGruff.org -- What You Need To Know About Drugs and Alcohol

 

Performance Indicators:

At Level 1, the student will be able to:

  • describe the consequences of using tobacco, alcohol and drugs.

At Level 2, the student will be able to:

  • describe how alcohol and drugs alter your mental state;
  • describe how the use of tobacco can affect healthful living;
  • describe how the use and abuse of alcohol and drugs can affect healthful living;
  • identify names of illegal drugs;
  • define appropriate refusal skills to avoid harmful substances;
  • describe how substance abuse can cause physical and mental disabilities.

At Level 3, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate appropriate refusal skills to avoid harmful substances;
  • assess the life of a substance abuser.

 

Teacher Assessment Indicators (examples):

The teacher may:

  • provide a sponge to represent the lung and a dark (mud or dirty oil) concoction to spread over the lung to represent the effects of tar and nicotine on the lungs and have students describe what they see;
  • provide plastic drink cups or distortion glasses for students to look through to simulate the affects of alcohol on vision and have the students describe how their vision is affected;
  • bring in a knowledgeable guest speaker to discuss the consequences of substance abuse.

 

Curriculum Integration:

Physical Education 3.6.


 

Environmental and Community Health

 

Domain Description: The health of the environment and community is directly impacted by responsible individual behavior. Public health and community services are essential to promote a healthy community.

 

Standard 16: The student will recognize environmental practices and products that affect personal and community health.

 

Learning Expectations:

The student will:

16.1 describe different types of pollution and it’s environmental affects;

NRDC's Green Squad: The Squad

 

16.2 identify the importance of "reduce, reuse, recycle" practices.

Kids Recycle!.

 

Performance Indicators:

At Level 1, the student will be able to:

  • identify different types of environmental pollution (e.g. ground, noise, water, air).

At Level 2, the student will be able to:

  • describe how environmental pollution affects healthful living;
  • identify the affects of litter on the environment;
  • define the terms "reduce, reuse, and recycle";
  • list items that are produced by the "reduce, reuse, and recycle" process;
  • define what a landfill is and describe its purpose.

At Level 3, the student will be able to:

  • select appropriate items for recycling (e.g. aluminum cans, plastic containers, cardboard, newspapers, and glass);
  • design a recycle center at your school.

 

Teacher Assessment Indicators (examples):

The teacher may:

  • display a bottle of tap water next to a container of river water and have the students identify the differences between the two and watch them change over time;
  • have students bring in one recyclable item;
  • have students implement and manage a recycle center at school that they have previously designed.

 

Curriculum Integration:

Social Studies 2.01; Life Science 2.4, 6.1; Earth Science 10.2; Math 3.2.9.

 

Standard 17: The student will be aware of and appropriately use community services that promote healthful living.

 

Learning Expectations:

The student will:

17.1 identify community health workers and the activities and programs they provide;

It's time to GET FIT Tennessee!

17.2 describe the importance of community organizations to healthful living.

It's time to GET FIT Tennessee!

It's time to GET FIT Tennessee!

 

Performance Indicators:

At Level 1, the student will be able to:

  • identify community health workers (e.g. nurses, doctors, dentists).

 

At Level 2, the student will be able to:

  • identify programs and places where health workers work (e.g. health department, hospitals);
  • explain the purpose of non-profit organizations that promote healthful living (e.g. American Heart Association, American Cancer Society, American Lung Association).

At Level 3, the student will be able to:

    • support non-profit organizations that promote healthful living through fund raising events.

 

Teacher Assessment Indicators (examples):

The teacher may:

  • create a role play scenario for the students to perform various jobs of health workers;
  • construct a display with the students that illustrates various health care workers;
  • coordinate a fund raising event for students to implement where the proceeds will be presented to a non-profit organization that promotes healthful living.

 

Curriculum Integration:

Computer Technology 7.1.


 

Consumer Health

 

Domain Description: According to the National Health Education Standards-Achieving Health Literacy "Accessing valid health information and health-promoting products and services is important in the prevention, early detection, and treatment of most health problems. Critical thinking involves the ability to…access health-promoting services and products. Applying skills of information analysis…provides a foundation for individuals to move toward becoming health literate and responsible, productive citizens".

 

Standard 18: The student will understand how culture, media, and technology impact consumer decisions about healthful living.

 

Learning Expectations:

The student will:

18.1 describe how culture influences personal health behaviors;

Children at Risk Issue

18.2 explain how media influences thoughts, feelings, and behaviors related to personal health and community;

Media Influence on Children

Media influence, teenage behavior, A Family Guide

18.3 describe ways technology can influence personal health.

Alliance for a Healthier Generation

Performance Indicators:

At Level 1, the student will be able to:

  • describe how personal diet, exercise, and hygiene is influenced by cultural lifestyles;
  • identify different types of media (e.g. magazines, radio, TV, and billboards).

At Level 2, the student will be able to:

  • tell how cultural beliefs relate to medical practices;
  • explain how media influences health behaviors.

At Level 3, the student will be able to:

  • identify how Internet use increases exposure to healthy and unhealthy information.

 

Teacher Assessment Indicators (examples):

The teacher may:

  • have students create an art project involving a billboard advertising something he/she likes (e.g. toy, food, clothes, etc.);
  • set up a grocery store in the classroom consisting of name brand, generic, and ethnic products. Have students go in and shop for 3 products. Discuss why they bought the products they did. Did they see it on TV? Did they see it in a magazine? Is it related to their culture?;
  • facilitate a student search of healthy and unhealthy information on the Internet (e.g. healthy versus unhealthy food sites).

 

Curriculum Integration:

Social Studies 1.01, 1.02, 1.03; English/Language Arts K.1.10-K.1.12; Visual Art 3.0.

 

Standard 19: The student will demonstrate the ability to access valid health information and health promoting products and services.

Learning Expectations:

The student will:

19.1 identify the various types of valid health resources.

It's time to GET FIT Tennessee!

Fruits & Veggies More Matters

Kids' Health - Home

 

Performance Indicators:

At Level 1, the student will be able to:

  • list people and places that provide health care.

At Level 2, the student will be able to:

  • explain the roles of health resources (e.g. pharmacy, school nurse, dentist, health department, EMT, fire/rescue, and doctor).

At Level 3, the student will be able to:

  • select a community health service provider to be a guest speaker.

 

 Teacher Assessment Indicators (examples):

The teacher may:

  • provide pictures of various places in the community (e.g. hospital, gas station, dental office, and restaurant) and have students pick the health care facilities;
  • assist the students in matching health workers to the tools of their trade (e.g. fireman to fire truck);
  • invite health service provider to speak in class. After speaker, have students draw picture of what the health service provider does at work.

 

Curriculum Integration:

Social Studies 2.01, 2.03; Computer Technology 7.1; English/Language Arts 1.1.10a, 2.1.10a.

 

 

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Healthful Living

 Grades 3-5

Personal Health and Wellness

Domain Description: Personal Health and Wellness is influenced by individual heredity and involves a lifelong process of choices and behaviors that lead to healthful living and disease prevention.

Standard 1: The student will understand the role of personal hygiene practices as it relates to healthful living.

 

Learning Expectations:

The student will:

1.1 demonstrate the concepts of personal hygiene in daily life;

1.2 describe physical/mental/social health implications of personal hygiene;

1.3 identify personal health responsibilities.

Performance Indicators:

At Level 1, the student will be able to:

  • describe basic personal hygiene methods including handwashing, dental/oral care, bathing/shampooing, and dressing;

  • explain that personal hygiene practices can affect personal health and friendships.

At Level 2, the student will be able to:

  • apply basic hygiene methods including handwashing, dental/oral care, bathing/shampooing, use of deodorant, and appropriate dress;

  • describe how good personal hygiene relates to a positive outlook and self image;

  • analyze the affect of personal hygiene on social relationships.

At Level 3, the student will be able to:

  • formulate personal hygiene practices;

  • integrate personal health responsibilities into daily activities.

Teacher Assessment Indicators (examples):

The teacher may:

  • have students list common basic personal hygiene practices that they perform daily;

  • have students compose a book or scrapbook about basic personal hygiene practices;

  • have students write an essay that describes the value of basic personal hygiene in developing positive self-image and social relationships.

Curriculum Integration:

N/A

 

Standard 2: The student will understand the role of body systems as related to healthful living.

Link to Importance of Water

Body System Movies

Learning Expectations:

The student will:

2.1 describe the basic human body structures;

2,2 describe the functions of the human body systems;

2.3 explain how health is influenced by the interaction of human body systems.

Performance Indicators:

At Level 1, the student will be able to:

  • name basic human body organs (e.g. heart, lungs, stomach, intestines, liver, and brain)

  • name major human body systems (e.g. muscular, skeletal, digestive, excretory, cardiovascular, circulatory, and respiratory);

At Level 2, the student will be able to:

  • compare functions of major human body systems;

  • illustrate ways the skeletal and muscular systems work together;

  • explain the structure and function of the skin;

  • classify components of various body systems.

At Level 3, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate the interaction of body systems.

Teacher Assessment Indicators (examples):

The teacher may:

  • have students list four basic body organs;

  • place students in groups to make a puzzle game using the major body systems;

  • read the Magic School Bus "Inside the Human Body" and show the video. After reading, have the students answer specific questions on a teacher made assessment (open book).

Curriculum Integration:

Math 2.1, 2.4; Life Science 1.1, 3.2, 5.1, Physical Education 4.6; Earth and Space Science 7.2, 14.2.

 

Standard 3: The student will understand the relationship of physical activity to healthful living.

Physical Fitness/Kids Health

Nutrition Fitness Center/Kids Health

Learning Expectations:

The student will:

3.1 explain the importance of physical activity to personal health;

3.2 identify personal physical activity practices in order to achieve desired physical fitness levels.

Performance Indicators:

At Level 1, the student will be able to:

  • explain the benefits of daily physical activity, good posture, rest, and sleep on personal health;

At Level 2, the student will be able to:

  • identify the effects of physical exercise on muscular growth and development;

  • select physical activities that will promote personal fitness;

  • implement a physical fitness program (e.g. physical activity, good posture, adequate rest and sleep).

At Level 3, the student will be able to:

  • assess the relationship between human growth and development and physical activity.

Teacher Assessment Indicators (examples):

The teacher may:

  • have students maintain a daily journal of physical activity and hours of sleep;

  • have students implement a personal fitness plan from activities they enjoy;

  • have students predict the results of positive health decisions (e.g. diet, physical activity, and sleep) as it relates to human growth and development.

Curriculum Integration:

Physical Education 1.1-1.13, 4.1-4.6, 5.6.

BAM! Body and Mind

http://www.bam.gov/sub_yourlife/index.html


Nutrition

Domain Description: Proper nutrition is essential for maintaining a healthy lifestyle. Healthful nutrition helps to prevent chronic diseases such as diabetes, cancer, and cardiovascular disease. Using the Food Guide Pyramid can provide guidelines for healthy eating. It is important to balance food intake and physical activity to promote healthful living.

Standard 4: The student will understand the relationship of nutrition to healthful living.

http://www.mypyramid.gov/

Kids Nutrition

Food Labels

Learning Expectations:

The student will:

4.1 use the Food Pyramid as a guide for choosing a variety of foods necessary for good health;

4.2 explain how weight is controlled by balancing diet and physical exercise.

Performance Indicators:

At Level 1, the student will be able to:

  • describe the Food Guide Pyramid;

  • identify the causes of obesity;

  • explain the importance of sanitary and safe handling of foods;

  • describe that adequate water intake and a nutritious breakfast are essential components of healthful living;

  • explain the role of dietary supplements and nutrients.

At Level 2, the student will be able to

  • name the reasons for including various foods within the Food Guide Pyramid;

  • demonstrate an understanding of proportionality in food choices;

  • explain the relationship between weight and a balanced diet and exercise regime;

  • explain the connection of junk food and calorie intake to poor nutrition and obesity;

  • analyze food labels in order to determine nutritional content;

  • demonstrate awareness of family, multicultural, and media influences on food choices.

At Level 3, the student will be able to:

  • prepare nutritious menus that include breakfast, lunch, supper, and healthy snacks;

  • assess personal current nutritional intake.

Teacher Assessment Indicators (examples):

The teacher may:

  • have students draw a food complete guide pyramid;

  • have students draw the foods they ate the day before(on paper or paper plate). Then have students compare what they ate to the Food Guide Pyramid, noting areas of strengths and weaknesses.

  • give students five different meal menus, and have them list the meals in order of nutritional value from highest to lowest.

Curriculum Integration:

English/Language Arts 3.2.08, 4.2.08, 5.2.08; Life Science 3.1, 3.2; Math 3.1, 5.2.8; Social Studies 1.01, 1.04; Physical Education 4.3, 4.5, 4.6.


Family Life

http://serendip.brynmawr.edu/complexity/Chalquist2.html

Sweet Memories of a Grandfather (search this site for “family life”)

Domain Description: The dynamic process of growth and development encompasses physical, mental, emotional, and social maturation. Positive personal and family relationships provide a foundation that promotes healthy development. (Refer to TCA 49-6-1303 with regard to children excused from family life instruction by parent or guardian).

Standard 5: The student will understand the contributions of family relationships to healthful living.

Learning Expectations:

The student will:

5.1 identify all families as unique;

5.2 demonstrate respect for the responsibilities of each person within the family;

5.3 identify how to improve family relationships;

5.4 describe how family structures change.

Performance Indicators:

At Level 1, the student will be able to:

  • describe a variety of family structures (e.g. two parent, single parent, blended, extended, foster, and adopted) and how they change over time;

  • know that being loved and cared for are human needs;

  • describe how abuse, neglect, and violence in the family do not promote healthy relationships.

At Level 2, the student will be able to:

  • examine roles, responsibilities, and contributions of family members;

  • describe how culture, religion, and ethnic diversity contribute to the variety of family structures in our society;

  • explain how environmental factors can affect family life (socio-economic factors, urban/suburban/rural areas, etc.);

  • apply conflict resolution skills to improve relationships within the family.

At Level 3, the student will be able to:

  • assess how individual attitudes and behaviors relate to family dynamics;

  • demonstrate support for the emotional needs of family members;

  • formulate a response plan for cases of neglect, abuse, and violence in the home (e.g. reporting incidents to a trusted adult and refusal skills).

Teacher Assessment Indicators (examples):

The teacher may:

  • lead students in class discussion of the different types of family structures;

  • lead students in role play of conflict resolution skills;

  • have students discuss family relationships and roles within homes and differences in family structures.

Curriculum Integration:

Physical Education 3.3, 3.5, 3.7, 3.8; Math 2.4.

 

Standard 6: The student will understand the stages of human growth and development.

Am I Normal?  ( search this site for “human growth & development”)

Learning Expectations:

The student will:

6.1 identify changes in the body that occur throughout the life cycle;

6.2 demonstrate respect for others as physical changes occur at varying rates.

Performance Indicators:

At Level 1, the student will be able to:

  • describe how the body changes as it grows and develops;

  • describe how physical growth and development is accompanied by changes in emotions.

  • define growth spurts.

At Level 2, the student will be able to:

  • compare changes in the body and emotions at different stages of the life cycle;

  • identify changes in the body and emotions that occur during puberty;

  • describe how reproductive changes relate to puberty;

  • compare and contrast the varying rates of change that occur with individuals.

  • demonstrate how to be respectful of others as they grow and develop.

  • consider how being respectful of an individual’s feelings and emotions is related to self-image during puberty.

Teacher Assessment Indicators (examples):

The teacher may:

  • have students write a cartoon strip to show the sequence of events throughout the life cycle;

  • ask parents to send in care package item(s) (e.g. deodorants, toothpaste, and soap). After distribution and discussion, have students write a paragraph about one of the items and the reasons for using it;

  • provide specific scenarios related to growth and development then have students describe respectful ways to be supportive of their classmates (e.g. voice changes-students laugh, and body odor);

Curriculum Integration:

Life Science 4.1, 4.2, 4.3, 6.2; Visual Art 1.3; Physical Education 3.7, 3.8, 3.9, 3.10; Math 2.4, 5.2.8.

 

Standard 7: The student will understand the need and process of setting personal goals and standards for healthful living.

Learning Expectations:

The student will:

7.1 identify effective decision making techniques;

7.2 determine influences on setting personal goals and standards;

7.3 apply the decision-making process in developing personal goals and standards that affect family life.

Performance Indicators:

At Level 1, the student will be able to:

  • describe the steps of the decision-making process;

  • explain the difference between short and long term personal goals.

At Level 2, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate the decision-making process;

  • analyze how influences affect personal decision-making processes;

  • describe the connection between choices, actions, and consequences;

  • identify how goals and standards relate to self worth.

At Level 3, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate how various people provide influences in personal choices;

  • demonstrate making personal choices based on reasoned arguments.

Teacher Assessment Indicators (examples):

The teacher may:

  • have students list the steps of the decision making process;

  • have students compare and contrast the decisions of a character in a story;

  • provide a variety of role-play situations in a basket for students to choose from. Have groups of students role-play the situations for the class then the rest of the class evaluates each role-playing situation and provides feedback.

Curriculum Integration:

Visual Art 1.10; Physical Education 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 3.4, 3.5, 3.9, 3.10, 4.5; Social Studies 6.01.


Emotional, Social, and Mental Health

Domain Description: Emotional, social, and mental health is dependent upon a healthy self-concept and communicating needs, wants, and feelings in a healthy manner. Conflict resolution, anger management, and stress management provide skills for healthful living.

Standard 8: The student will understand the importance of positive self-concept and interpersonal relationships for healthful living.

http://www.bam.gov/

Self-Esteem (search “self concept” at this site)

Dealing with Feelings

Learning Expectations:

The student will:

8.1 describe how feelings affect behavior;

8.2 demonstrate respect for the unique qualities of self and others;

8.3 describe characteristics to be a responsible friend and family member.

Performance Indicators:

At Level 1, the student will be able to:

  • discuss the connection between feelings and behavior;

  • explain that emotions may be expressed in different ways;

  • identify appropriate manners.

At Level 2, the student will be able to:

  • analyze how tolerant behaviors can reduce prejudice, discrimination and bullying (e.g. race, culture, disabilities, and gender);

  • describe the feelings involved in the grieving process;

  • demonstrate non-abrasive behaviors toward others;

  • demonstrate respect for individual and cultural differences;

  • demonstrate appropriate ways to include individuals with disabilities.

At Level 3, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate qualities that promote healthy relationships (e.g. integrity, trust, nurturing, responsibility, and manners);

  • formulate skills for building self-esteem;

  • select appropriate strategies for managing positive and negative stress.

Teacher Assessment Indicators (examples):

The teacher may:

  • have students identify appropriate manners from a list provided by the teacher;

  • ask students to role-play situations that might lead to bullying, prejudice, or discrimination;

  • develop a character map of a character in a story. After listing traits, have students determine if the character would have a positive self-image and the feelings in the story related to self-concept.

Curriculum Integration:

Social Studies 4.03, 4.04; Physical Education 2.2, 2.3, 3.2, 3.3, 3.6, 3.7, 3.8, 3.9, 3.10, 3.11, 5.2, 5.5, 5.7; Visual Art 2.5; English/Language Arts 3.2.03-3.2.05, 4.2.03-4.2.05, 5.2.03-5.2.05.

 

Standard 9: The student will understand how positive social, emotional, and mental health practices promote healthful living.

Learning Expectations:

The student will:

9.1 identify how attitudes and behaviors, and attitudes relate to social health;

9.2 develop skills for dealing with pleasant and unpleasant situations;

9.3 describe how feelings, behaviors, and attitudes relate to personal mental health.

Performance Indicators:

At Level 1, the student will be able to:

  • describe the importance of responsibility and cooperation;

  • describe the effect of hormones on social/emotional/mental health;

  • identify healthy ways of dealing with anger.

At Level 2, the student will be able to:

  • identify how attitudes affect behavior toward individuals different from oneself;

  • demonstrate awareness of conflict resolution skills;

  • demonstrate respect for the rights of others;

  • demonstrate communication skills to develop and maintain healthy relationships;

  • identify the affects of gangs and bullying on social/emotional/mental health;

  • describe the signs and symptoms of depression and their effects on healthful living.

At Level 3, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate the valuing of self-worth and self-confidence;

  • formulate strategies for dealing with various life situations (e.g. family life incidents, relationships, grief, divorce, death, and dying).

Teacher Assessment Indicators (examples):

The teacher may:

  • provide students with a blank check list of household chores. Have students insert their own chores, take the list home, and check them off as completed;

  • give students a scenario and have them write a story in which the main character must demonstrate conflict resolution skills.

  • have students write an essay describing a major event in their life and how they dealt with it, and then have them evaluate their strategies.

Curriculum Integration:

Physical Education 3.2, 3.5, 3.6, 5.1, 5.2, 5.3, 5.4, 5.6, 5.7; Visual Art 1.6; English/Language Arts 3.2.09, 4.2.09, 5.2.09.


Disease Prevention and Control

Domain Description: Disease prevention is greatly influenced by health enhancing knowledge and behaviors practiced throughout life.

Standard 10: The student will understand attitudes and behaviors for preventing and controlling disease.

http://www.bam.gov/sub_yourbody/yourbody_diabetes.html

Learning Expectations:

The student will:

10.1 compare and contrast communicable and non-communicable diseases;

10.2 describe ways diseases are spread, prevented, and managed;

10.3 distinguish between safe and risky behaviors as related to disease prevention.

Performance Indicators:

At Level 1, the student will be able to:

  • define communicable and non-communicable diseases;

  • identify universal precautions.

At Level 2, the student will be able to:

  • analyze the relationship between communicable disease and hygiene, childhood diseases and parasites;

  • apply universal precautions in every day life;

  • describe the risk-reduction behaviors that prevent the spread of germs and viruses including HIV;

  • identify possible causes and prevention of heart disease, cancer, diabetes, high blood pressure, stroke, asthma/allergies (e.g. heredity, environment, and life styles);

  • relate factual information about HIV/AIDS.

At Level 3, the student will be able to:

  • assess the relationship between illness and alcohol and tobacco use.

Teacher Assessment Indicators (examples):

The teacher may:

  • provide the students with a word find puzzle containing the names of communicable and non-communicable diseases. The students will find the hidden words and then categorize the words into communicable or non-communicable columns;

  • have students create a "billboard" about preventing the spread of communicable diseases;

  • have students write a letter to someone stating the reasons to not begin smoking or the reasons to quit smoking if they are already a smoker.

Curriculum Integration:

Life Science 1.1, 2.1, 2.2, 4.1, 5.2, 6.2; Physical Education 4.3, 4.4, 4.6; English/Language Arts 3.1.01, 3.1.03, 3.1.04, 3.1.06, 3.1.08, 4.1.01, 4.1.03, 4.1.04, 4.1.06, 4.1.08, 5.1.01, 5.1.03, 5.1.04, 5.1.06, 5.1.08.


Injury Prevention and Safety

Domain Description: According to All About Risk Watch, "Every time a child is injured or killed by something that could have been prevented, everyone suffers - the child, his or her family, classmates and friends, and the entire community. For children ages 14 and under, the #1 health risk isn’t drugs or disease: it’s injuries."

Standard 11: The student will understand attitudes and behaviors for preventing accidents and injuries.

Personal Safety

http://www.crimereduction.gov.uk/personalsafety.htm

Learning Expectations:

The student will:

11.1 list the eight most common injury risks for children

11.2 identify ways to reduce the risk of accidents and injuries.

11.3 explain the importance of safety rules.

Performance Indicators:

At Level 1, the student will be able to:

  • identify the 8 most common risks of childhood injury and death (poisoning, fire & burns, bike & pedestrian accidents, firearm accidents, motor vehicle accidents, choking/suffocation and strangulation, drowning, and falls);

  • list two or more rules for preventing falls.

At Level 2, the student will be able to:

  • describe how personal risk behaviors relate to the 8 most common risks of childhood injury and death;

  • explain safety precautions that would help prevent accidents/injuries (e.g. helmet, pads, harnesses, seat belts, sun safety, bus safety, water safety, personal safety, gun safety, etc.).

At Level 3, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate safety precautions to daily life situations.

Teacher Assessment Indicators (examples):

The teacher may:

  • have students bring in safety equipment and demonstrate proper equipment usage in a show and tell situation;

  • invite outside agencies to come into the class and demonstrate safety techniques. After discussion, place students in groups and develop a jingle that focuses on injury prevention;

  • have students write a short story concerning personal safety and how the use or misuse of safety precautions or equipment affects its outcome.

Curriculum Integration:

Physical Education 1.11, 1.13, 3.1, 3.3, 3.5; English/Language Arts 3.2.01, 4.2.01, 5.2.01.

 

Standard 12: The student will understand appropriate care for injuries and sudden illnesses.

Learning Expectations:

The student will:

12.1 describe appropriate actions for emergency and non-emergency situations;

12.2 demonstrate first aid techniques.

Performance Indicators:

At Level 1, the student will be able to:

  • distinguish between emergency and non-emergency situations;

  • explain the importance of first aid and emergency care.

At Level 2, the student will be able to:

  • analyze situations that may require administration of basic first aid techniques;

  • demonstrate basic first aid techniques for emergency care (e.g. A-B-C, poisoning, wounds, burns, insect bites, allergic reactions, seizures/fainting, CPR, Heimlich Maneuver, broken bones, sprains and strains);

  • demonstrate an ability to locate and utilize resources in emergency situations (e.g. 911 telephone number, first aid kit, and fire extinguisher).

At Level 3, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate proper first aid techniques for emergencies;

  • design a plan of action for various emergency situations.

Teacher Assessment Indicators (examples):

The teacher may:

  • provide small groups with a box containing pieces of paper with emergency and non-emergency situations from which the students will draw. Have students categorize the situations as emergency and non-emergency.

  • place students in groups and observe them demonstrating proper first aid techniques;

  • provide the students with different emergency situations. Have students write out a plan of action for their emergency situation

Curriculum Integration:

Visual Art 1.3, English/Language Arts 3.2.01, 4.2.01, 5.2.01.

 

Standard 13: The student will understand the appropriate action to take when personal safety is threatened.

http://www.bam.gov/sub_yourbody/index.html

Learning Expectations:

The student will:

13.1 identify situations that should be reported to a trusted adult;

13.2 demonstrate self-protection skills and identify appropriate resources for help.

Performance Indicators:

At Level 1, the student will be able to:

  • describe physical, sexual, and emotional abuse and the appropriate procedures to follow for reporting;

  • explain safety procedures for staying home alone for short periods of time (latch key kids).

At Level 2, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate self protection skills to maximize personal safety (e.g. refusal skills, instincts);

  • describe behaviors that threaten personal safety;

  • analyze procedures to follow in case of natural or man-made disasters;

  • explain where to find immediate help in unsafe situations;

  • differentiate between appropriate and inappropriate touch (e.g. good, bad, confusing);

  • Identify situations of abuse and neglect (e.g. physical and mental harm, being left home along for long periods of time, and lack of food).

At Level 3, the student will be able to:

  • prepare a plan to be used at home for natural disasters (e.g. fire, tornado, earthquake).

  • analyze personal behavior relative to unsafe situations.

Teacher Assessment Indicators (examples):

The teacher may:

  • have students develop a list of trusted adults to whom they can report suspected abuse;

  • have students produce a puppet show that focuses on personal safety measures;

  • have students prepare and present a personal plan to be used at home for natural disasters (e.g. fire, tornado, earthquake).

Curriculum Integration:

Earth and Space Science 8.1, 8.2, 9.1, 9.2.


Substance Use and Abuse Prevention

Domain Description: The use of chemical substances can have both benefits and risks. Knowledge, attitudes, and personal choices can determine responsible behaviors towards the use of chemical substances, including the avoidance of alcohol and tobacco.

Standard 14: The student will understand appropriate and inappropriate uses of chemical substances for healthful living.

Learning Expectations:

The student will:

14.1 distinguish between appropriate use and the misuse/abuse of chemical substances for healthful living;

14.2 analyze the influences of peers, family, and community on chemical substance use and abuse.

Performance Indicators:

http://www.bam.gov/sub_yourlife/index.html

At Level 1, the student will be able to:

  • classify chemical substances for healthful living as medicinal and non-medicinal;

  • list the positive and negative effects of peer pressure.

At Level 2, the student will be able to:

  • explain the difference between appropriate use and the abuse of chemical substances for healthful living;

  • identify the difference between proper use and misuse of medicinal substances;

  • connect influences of the family, community, and media to personal views of appropriate use and the abuse of chemical substances.

At Level 3, the student will be able to:

  • compose a list of resources that may provide positive influences in decisions concerning appropriate chemical substance use for healthful living.

Teacher Assessment Indicators (examples):

Got butterflies?

The teacher may:

  • divide the class into groups of three. Assign each group to create a short skit that demonstrates a situation where peer pressure has a negative or positive effect on the outcome;

  • divide the class into two groups and have them participate in a panel discussion related to either appropriate or inappropriate use of substances for healthful living;

  • have students locate an internet resource that provides positive and appropriate information concerning chemical substance use. The students then write a short paragraph explaining why they would recommend the site to others.

Curriculum Integration:

English/Language Arts 3.1.01, 4.1.01, 5.1.01; Computer Technology 5.1, Earth and Space Science 12.1, 12.2.

 

Standard 15: The student will understand the effects of substance use and abuse.

Learning Expectations:

The student will:

15.1 evaluate the effects of substance use and abuse (e.g. tobacco, alcohol, and illegal drugs) on physical, mental, and social functioning;

15.2 demonstrate decision making and refusal skills;

15.3 explain how personal choices relate to health and wellness consequences.

Performance Indicators:

At Level 1, the student will be able to:

  • explain how the avoidance of substances can enhance physical, mental and social functioning;

  • describe the effects of substance use, abuse and misuse on physical, mental and social functioning.

At Level 2, the student will be able to:

  • practice skills needed to avoid risk-taking behaviors (e.g. decision making, conflict resolution, and refusal skills);

  • explain the connections between substance abuse and health related illnesses (e.g. heart disease, cancer, cirrhosis of the liver, and impaired mental functioning);

  • analyze the relationship between substance abuse/misuse and negative consequences (e.g. legal ramifications, personal finances, successful relationships).

At Level 3, the student will be able to:

  • draw conclusions concerning the quality of life of those individuals who choose to use and abuse substances.

Teacher Assessment Indicators (examples):

The teacher may:

  • provide the students with a list of true and false statements concerning the affects of substances on physical, mental, and social functioning. Students will indicate which statements are true and false;

  • provide the students with the beginning of a story that involves an opportunity to abuse a substance. The students will demonstrate their decision-making and refusal skills by completing the story;

  • have the students write an essay comparing and contrasting their future lives based on their choices related to the use of substances.

Curriculum Integration:

Earth and Space Science 12.1, 12.2; English/Language Arts 3.2.02, 4.2.02, 5.2.02.


Environmental and Community Health

Domain Description: The health of the environment and the community is directly impacted by responsible individual behavior. Public health and community services are essential to promote a healthy community.

Standard 16: The student will recognize environmental practices and products that affect personal and community health.

Learning Expectations:

The student will:

16.1 identify the causes and effects of different types of pollution on health;

16.2 apply the practices of "reduce, reuse, and recycle";

16.3 evaluate and select environmentally safe products.

Performance Indicators:

At Level 1, the student will be able to:

  • identify various types of pollution (e.g. water, air, noise, and ground).

At Level 2, the student will be able to:

  • describe the importance of environmental practices and their impact on healthful living;

  • identify the causes of water, air, noise and ground pollution;

  • demonstrate the practices of "reduce, reuse, and recycle.";

  • analyze information on labels to determine whether products are environmentally safe;

  • describe the steps individuals can take to promote safe water supplies, sanitary trash, and sewage disposals;

  • determine which household cleaners and pesticides/insecticides are environmentally friendly;

  • demonstrate personal routines that enhance a healthy environment (e.g. trash disposal, conservation of water, energy, and natural resources).

At Level 3, the student will be able to:

  • assess the effects of pollution on personal and community health.

Teacher Assessment Indicators (examples):

The teacher may:

  • have the students draw a picture of a polluted environment and write a short essay describing the types of pollution illustrated;

  • bring in labels of products and have students determine if the products are environmentally safe (e.g. tuna, aerosols cans, etc.);

  • have students make charts that show the cause and effects of pollution on air, ground, and water;

Curriculum Integration:

Social Studies 2.01, 2.02, 2.03; Life Science 6.1, 6.2; Earth and Space Science 8.1, 8.2, 8.3, Math 2.1, 5.2.5.

 

Standard 17: The student will be aware of and appropriately use community services that promote healthful living.

Learning Expectations:

The student will:

17.1 describe ways health agencies assist in promoting health and the environment;

17.2 explain the importance of community organizations to healthful living.

Performance Indicators:

At Level 1, the student will be able to:

  • identify public, professional, and voluntary agencies and their roles in community health (e.g. health department, EPA, recycling agencies, and OSHA).

At Level 2, the student will be able to:

  • explain how health agencies promote healthy schools and home environments;

  • analyze situations that may require a health agency to be contacted for assistance.

At Level 3, the student will be able to:

  • appraise the importance of health agencies to the community.

Teacher Assessment Indicators (examples):

The teacher may:

  • have the students list various community agencies and identify the services they provide;

  • create a health situation that requires medical assistance (e.g. toothache, cough, blurry vision, sore ear, etc.). Have each student determine which healthcare professional to contact by using the yellow pages to write down an appropriate doctor’s specialty, name, and phone number;

  • show an instructional video of a child, needing medical attention, from a disadvantaged country or community. Have the students write a story about how community health agencies and providers could improve the child’s health.

Curriculum Integration:

Social Studies 2.02, 5.14; English/Language Arts 3.2.02, 4.2.02, 5.2.02; Computer Technology 7.3.


Consumer Health

Domain Description: According to the National Health Education Standards – Achieving Health Literacy, accessing valid health information and health-promoting products and services is important in the prevention, early detection, and treatment of most health problems. Critical thinking involves the ability to…access health-promoting services and products. Applying skills of information analysis…provides a foundation for individuals to move toward becoming health literate and responsible, productive citizens".

Standard 18: The student will understand how the culture, media, and technology impact consumer decisions about healthful living.

Learning Expectations:

The student will:

18.1 describe the influence of cultural beliefs on personal and community health behaviors and the use of health services;

18.2 analyze how messages from media and technology influence health behaviors.

Performance Indicators:

At Level 1, the student will be able to:

  • explain how individual decisions related to health behaviors and services are often connected to media, technology, and/or cultural influences and beliefs.

At Level 2, the student will be able to:

  • interpret advertising methods which are used to promote the sale of health-related products;

  • describe the relationship between culture and personal/community health practices;

  • explain the importance of obtaining valid information regarding health products and services;

  • analyze how media messages affect personal image and self worth.

At Level 3, the student will be able to:

  • judge the validity of health information from a variety of sources (e.g. internet, media, magazines, etc.).

Teacher Assessment Indicators (examples):

The teacher may:

  • bring in a taped commercial of a product and have students analyze the techniques used to influence them to purchase that item (e.g. what appeals to them?);

  • schedule a guest speaker from a different culture to speak about their culture’s health practices. Have the students compare and contrast the guest speaker’s culture to their own;

  • have students visit predetermined web sites to find health related information and asses the validity of the information received.

Curriculum Integration:

Physical Education 1.8, 3.6, 3.7, 3.8, 3.9; Computer Technology 2.3; English/Language Arts 3.1.10, 4.1.09, 5.1.10, 5.1.12; Social Studies 1.01, 1.02, 1.03, 1.04.

 

Standard 19: The student will demonstrate the ability to access valid health information and health-promoting products and services.

Learning Expectations:

The student will:

19.1 access valid health information;

19.2 explain the uses of various health-promoting products and services.

Performance Indicators:

At Level 1, the student will be able to:

  • identify sources of valid health information (e.g. physician, nurse, health department, internet, pharmacist);

  • identify health facilities which can be found in the community (e.g. YMCA, fitness centers, community centers, etc.).

At Level 2, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate the ability to access valid health information;

  • analyze labels to determine products which may promote healthful living;

  • identify the role of exercise equipment in overall personal health;

  • select health promoting products which may enhance personal health needs;

  • differentiate between proper use and abuse of health products (e.g. energy drinks, performance enhancing drugs, exercise equipment, etc.).

At Level 3, the student will be able to:

  • compose a personal health and fitness plan to review with their parents, which includes the appropriate use of health promoting products and services.

Teacher Assessment Indicators (examples):

The teacher may:

  • have students draw a picture of their community consisting of various health facilities;

  • have the students locate specific health related services and products using local phone books;

  • have the students compose a personal health and fitness plan to review with their parents, which includes the appropriate use of health promoting products and services.

Curriculum Integration:

Social Studies 2.01, 2.03; Computer Technology 5.1; English/Language Arts 3.1.10, 4.1.09, 5.1.10.

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Healthful Living

 Grades 6-8

 

Personal Health and Wellness

Domain Description: Personal Health and Wellness is influenced by individual heredity and involves a lifelong process of choices and behaviors that lead to healthful living and disease prevention.

Standard 1: The student will understand the role of personal hygiene practices as related to healthful living.

Your Body/Teens

Learning Expectations:

The student will:

1.1 evaluate basic personal hygiene habits;

1.2 analyze the changes in health and hygiene needs related to adolescence.

Performance Indicators:

At Level 1, the student will be able to:

  • explain basic personal hygiene habits (e.g., hand washing, bathing, shampooing, oral care, and foot care).
  • Hygiene Basics

At Level 2, the student will be able to:

  • display personal grooming habits.

At Level 3, the student will be able to:

  • analyze personal choices of self-expression as they relate to healthful living (e.g., clothing styles, tattoos, and body piercing).
  • Body Art
  • Tattoos

Teacher Assessment Indicator (examples):

The teacher may:

  • have students keep a basic hygiene habits checklist for one week;
  • designate a day of the week to be student "dress-up day";
  • have students write an essay supporting personal choices of self-expression.

Curriculum Integration:

N/A

Standard 2: The student will understand the role of body systems as related to healthful living.

Girls Complete Guide/Notebook on Health

Human Body Systems

Learning Expectations:

The student will:

2.1 describe and analyze the basic body systems and functions of the human body;

2.2 explain the functions of the human body;

2.3 explain the impact of personal health behaviors on the functioning of human body systems.

Performance Indicators:

At Level 1, the student will be able to:

  • list all human body systems;
  • tell how personal choice impacts human body systems (e.g. sleep, food selections, and risk behaviors).
  • Learn to Be Healthy

At Level 2, the student will be able to:

  • describe the structure and functions of the body systems via models, illustrations, games;
  • explain repercussions of risk behaviors on body systems (e.g. smoking, drug use, alcohol, sexual activity, and high fat diet).
  • Sexual Health
  • Abstinence
  • Drugs & Alcohol
  • Tobacco Free

At Level 3, the student will be able to:

Teacher Assessment Indicator (examples):

The teacher may:

  • have students correctly place organs in a human body model;
  • have small groups demonstrate and illustrate the structure and functions of the different body systems;
  • have students create a personal behavior contract for a skill they wish to improve (e.g. sleep, fitness, academics, relationships, or risk behaviors).
  • Choose Today

Curriculum Integration:

Physical Education 4.4, 4.8, 4.9; Life Science 1.1, 3.3.

 

Standard 3: The student will understand the relationship of physical activity to healthful living.

Walk Across Tennessee

Walking Calorie Calculator

PBS Teachers Health & Fitness

Learning Expectations:

The student will:

3.1 identify the necessary components for physical fitness;

3.2 determine the benefits of exercise in relation to improved health during all stages of life;

3.3 assess the relationship of physical activity to other areas of personal health (social, mental, and emotional well-being).

Performance Indicators:

At Level 1, the student will be able to:

At Level 2, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate flexibility, muscle strength, muscle endurance, agility, and cardiovascular fitness;
  • CDC Five Components of Physical Fitness
  • describe how physical activity relates to stress management, socialization, and mental acuity.
  •  

At Level 3, the student will be able to:

Teacher Assessment Indicator (examples):

The teacher may:

  • have students list various physical activities and place them in an appropriate fitness component;
  • have students list personal physical choices for stress management;
  • divide students into small groups to develop a fitness plan for the various life stages.

Curriculum Integration:

Physical Education 1.5, 4.1, 4.2, 4.3, 4.5, 4.7,4.12, 5.1, 5.3, 5.4, 5.5, 5.6, 5.11, 5.12.


Nutrition

Domain Description: Proper nutrition is essential for maintaining a healthy lifestyle. Healthful nutrition helps to prevent chronic diseases such as diabetes, cancer, and cardiovascular disease. Using the Food Guide Pyramid can provide guidelines for healthy eating. It is important to balance food intake and physical activity to promote healthful living.

Standard 4: The student will understand the relationship of nutrition to healthful living.

Learn to Be Healthy

Links to nutrition

Learning Expectations:

The student will:

4.1 explain the relationship of a balanced nutrition program and essential nutrients to appropriate weight, appearance, energy level and total wellness;

4.2 evaluate how individual food choices are influenced by multiple factors;

4.3 describe body composition and eating disorders;

4.4 practice principles of food safety.

Performance Indicators:

At Level 1, the student will be able to:

  • illustrate the food pyramid;
  • describe serving sizes;
  • demonstrate principles of food storage, preparation, and sanitation;
  • interpret the statement "You are what you eat" (e.g., junk foods, calories, fat content, cholesterol, overweight, performance);
  • identify nutrients and minerals.
  • Food Pyramid

At Level 2, the student will be able to:

  • contrast USDA Dietary Guidelines to personal diet;
  • USDA Dietary Guideline
  • analyze a food label (calories, nutrients, minerals, fat and cholesterol content, serving size, percentage of RDA);
  • Nutrition Label Lessons
  • explain how nutrients and minerals relate to body growth and development;
  • evaluate how individual food choices are influenced by multiple factors (e.g., ethnic cultures, personal belief systems, advertising, peer pressure, and food fads).
  • Food Pyramid

At Level 3, the student will be able to:

  • prepare a food diary for one week;
  • draw conclusions about individual food choices to set nutritional needs;
  • judge the need for nutritional supplements (e.g., vitamins, homeopathic supplements, and herbal);
  • identify how the media influences unhealthful nutrition decisions that promote eating disorders;
  • formulate body mass index (e.g. body composition versus body image).
  • Kids Health/Teen Food & Nutrition
  • Kids Health/Teen Recipes

Teacher Assessment Indicator (examples):

The teacher may:

  • have students compare and contrast the nutritional value of five different foods using the nutritional information found on food labels;
  • administer written test to students on USDA Dietary Guidelines;
  • have students analyze their food diary by comparing and contrasting it to the USDA Dietary Guidelines.

Curriculum Integration:

Life Science 3.1


Family Life

Domain Description: The dynamic process of growth and development encompasses physical, mental, emotional, and social maturation. Positive personal and family relationships provide a foundation that promotes healthy development. (Refer to TCA 49-6-1303 with regard to children excused from family life instruction by parent or guardian).

Standard 5: The student will understand the contributions of family relationships to healthful living.

Most Valuable Parents Guide to building relationship with children

Kids Health/Teen Your Mind

PBS Teachers Health & Fitness

Have the Talk with Teenagers

Learning Expectations:

The student will:

5.1 identify family influences in the development of personal values and beliefs and how they will affect future decisions;

5.2 analyze changing roles and responsibilities throughout the life cycle as members of families;

5.3 evaluate the influence of attitudes and behaviors on healthy family relationships.

 

Performance Indicators:

At Level 1, the student will be able to:

  • describe family structures, roles, and how they may change;
  • understand that character is developed within the family structure (e.g., two parent, single parent, blended, extended, foster and adoptive families).

At Level 2, the student will be able to:

  • identify how personal values impact gender discrimination, harassment, domestic violence, and abuses.
  •  

At Level 3, the student will be able to:

  • explain roles and influences on personality development.

Teacher Assessment Indicator (examples):

The teacher may:

  • have students construct a character pyramid using words that support family development (e.g. caring, honest, manners, respect, chores, cheerful, listens, helps, etc.) Have students explain the roles and responsibilities of family members;
  • have students write an essay about a family’s personal values and influences as it relates to personal choices and behaviors;
  • lead a group discussion evaluating the family relationships of a television family.

Curriculum Integration:

Computer Technology 2.0; Social Studies 1.01, 1.05.

 

Standard 6: The student will understand the stages of human growth and development.

Learn To Be Healthy

Lesson Transformation

Learning Expectations:

The student will:

6.1 describe and demonstrate understanding of the developmental characteristics of adolescence including physical and emotional changes;

6.2 exhibit respect for others as physical changes occur during adolescence;

6.3 identify abstinence from sexual activity as the responsible and preferred choice for adolescents.

Performance Indicators:

At Level 1, the student will be able to:

At Level 2, the student will be able to:

At Level 3, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate decision-making skills that support good personal health (e.g. role playing and refusal skills).
  •  

Teacher Assessment Indicator (examples):

The teacher may:

  • have students take a vocabulary test;
  • have students take a matching test on HIV/STDs;
  • create scenarios with students role playing refusal skills.

Curriculum Integration:

Physical Education 4.11

Standard 7: The student will understand the need and process of setting personal goals and standards for healthful living.

Five Facts About Goal Setting

Everyday Activities Slide Show

How to Start Getting Fit

Links and Resources to Healthy Living

Learning Expectations:

The student will:

7.1 analyze the effectiveness of personal decision-making as it relates to future health and wellness outcomes;

7.2 describe individual goals and aspirations for healthful living;

7.3 determine how setting healthful living goals can promote lifetime wellness.

Performance Indicators:

At Level 1, the student will be able to:

  • describe different kinds of friendships;
  • describe how self-worth and confidence is used to build self-reliance.

At Level 2, the student will be able to:

  • differentiate between long and short-term personal goals;
  • explain the influence that peer pressure has on personal decision-making and goal-setting.

At Level 3, the student will be able to:

  • debate realistic vs. unrealistic goals.

Teacher Assessment Indicator (examples):

The teacher may:

  • have students list characteristics of a quality friendship;
  • have students list short and long-term personal goals including possible outcomes;
  • have students analyze the validity of their personal goals.

Curriculum Integration:

Physical Education 3.8, 3.9, 4.2, 5.7.


Emotional, Social, and Mental Health

Domain Description: Emotional, social, and mental health is dependent upon a healthy self-concept and communicating needs, wants, and feelings in a healthy manner. Conflict resolution, anger management, and stress management provide skills for healthful living.

Standard 8: The student will understand the importance of positive self-concept and interpersonal relationships for healthful living.

Kids Health/Mind – Scroll down to Relationships

Self-Esteem

NIMH Mental Disorders and Help for Parents

Learning Expectations:

The student will:

8.1 demonstrate healthy ways to express needs, wants, and feelings;

8.2 demonstrate respect for individual and cultural differences that help develop healthy relationships.

Performance Indicators:

At Level 1, the student will be able to:

  • list different emotions (e.g. anger, jealousy, frustration, love, hate, disappointment, and satisfaction);
  • identify how manners improve self-worth.

At Level 2, the student will be able to:

  • assess how communication skills manage emotions and build tolerance.

At Level 3, the student will be able to:

  • describe individual differences (e.g. mental, physical, and medical disabilities);
  • demonstrate strategies for including individuals who have disabilities.

Teacher Assessment Indicator (examples):

The teacher may:

  • assign students a partner to practice proper introduction skills;
  • elicit student volunteers to role play communication with body language;
  • assign students an essay entitled "Who Am I?" Include cultural, ethnic, and gender roles.

Curriculum Integration:

English/Language Arts 6.1.01h, 6.2.02f, 7.1.01h, 7.2.02g; Physical Education 3.1, 3.2, 3.3,3.4, 3.5, 3.7,3.10, 5.1, 5.2, 5.4, 5.11; Social Studies 6.01.

 

Standard 9: The student will understand how positive social, emotional, and mental health practices promote healthful living.

Lesson Plans from Advocates for Youth – various topics from which to choose

82 Page Booklet on Communication Skills

 

Learning Expectations:

The student will:

9.1 demonstrate skills to cope with attitudes and behaviors appropriately as related to social health;

9.2 demonstrate strategies for managing pleasant and unpleasant situations;

9.3 evaluate attitudes and behaviors as related to personal and mental health.

Performance Indicators:

At Level 1, the student will be able to:

  • define and discuss signs and symptoms of depression, stress, abuse, and anger.

At Level 2, the student will be able to:

  • identify and distinguish between refusal skills, negotiation skills, and coping skills.

At Level 3, the student will be able to:

  • prepare a plan for recovering from and coping with relationships that have changed (e.g. family and peers).

Teacher Assessment Indicator (examples):

The teacher may:

  • administer a vocabulary test for students;
  • have students chart similarities and differences of refusal skills, negotiation skills , and coping skills;
  • have students write an essay that evaluates their social, emotional, and mental health practices for one day.

Curriculum Integration:

Physical Education 4.12, 5.11


Disease Prevention and Control

Domain Description: Disease prevention is greatly influenced by health enhancing knowledge and behaviors practiced throughout life.

Standard 10: The student will understand attitudes and behaviors for preventing and controlling disease.

Learning Expectation:

The student will:

10.1 describe signs, symptoms, and risk factors related to communicable and non-communicable diseases;

10.2 evaluate how heredity, environment and lifestyle impact both the wellness and disease process.

Performance Indicators:

At Level 1, the student will be able to:

  • list communicable diseases including HIV/AIDS, and STD’s;
  • define the following non- communicable diseases: heart disease, hypertension, cancer, diabetes, obesity, stroke, and asthma/allergies.

At Level 2, the student will be able to:

  • describe the prevention, warning signs, and treatment of heart disease, hypertension, cancer, diabetes, obesity, stroke and, asthma/allergies;
  • explain the importance of universal precautions;
  • explain that in terms of the relationship between sexual activity and the risk of being infected with HIV/AIDS or STD’s, abstinence from all genital contact is the only sure method of preventing sexual transmission.

At Level 3, the student will be able to:

  • assess the impact of environmental pollution, ozone depletion, etc. on one’s health and of ergonomics in preventing health related injuries.

Teacher Assessment Indicator (examples):

The teacher may:

  • have students design a pamphlet that includes origin, symptoms, prevention and treatment of a communicable or non-communicable disease;
  • administer a written objective test to students to assess student’s knowledge of different STDs including HIV, modes of transmission, and treatment;
  • assist students in computer lab searching the web for information on environmental impacts.

Curriculum Integration:

Physical Education 3.8; Social Studies 1.04, 3.07, 3.08; Life Science 1.1, 1.2, 1.4, 4.2, 4.3, 5.1; Computer Technology 2.1h.


Injury Prevention and Safety

Domain Description: According to All About Risk Watch, "Every time a child is injured or killed by something that could have been prevented, everyone suffers – the child, his or her family, classmates and friends, and the entire community. For children ages 14 and under, the #1 health risk isn’t drugs or disease: it’s injuries."

Standard 11: The student will understand attitudes and behaviors for preventing accidents and injuries.

Staying Safe

Learning Expectations:

The student will:

11.1 evaluate ways to reduce the risks of accidents and injuries;

11.2 analyze the importance of safety rules.

Performance Indicators:

At Level 1, the student will be able to:

  • list safety equipment used for injury prevention (e.g. helmets, pads, harnesses, sunscreen, seatbelts, life preservers, etc.).

At Level 2, the student will be able to:

  • assess behaviors and circumstances that promote seatbelt safety, gun safety, recreational sports, water safety, and poison prevention;
  • assess behaviors and circumstances that promote self-protection skills and assertiveness training.

At Level 3, the student will be able to:

  • generate a list of hazards that can cause people to fall and a list of ways to prevent falls.

Teacher Assessment Indicator (examples):

The teacher may:

  • have a safety poster contest for students;
  • have the students list three poisonous substances in their home and a treatment action plan;
  • assign small groups of students to discuss ways to prevent falls;
  • have the students write a paper as a group on how they think the world would be without safety rules.

Curriculum Integration:

Visual Arts 6.2; Physical Education 2.4, 3.5, 3.8, 4.6, 5.10.

 

Standard 12: The student will understand appropriate care for injuries and sudden illness.

Learning Expectations:

The student will:

12.1 demonstrate appropriate actions for emergency and non-emergency situations;

12.2 demonstrate first aid techniques.

Performance Indicators:

At Level 1, the student will be able to:

  • identify different types of emergencies and proper first-aid techniques to address them.

At Level 2, the student will be able to:

  • list emergency response procedures (e.g. seizures, insect bites, poisoning, falls, allergic reactions, drug overdose, CPR, Heimlich Maneuver, and burns).

At Level 3, the student will be able to:

  • compare the similarities and differences of emergency procedures and emergency resources.

Teacher Assessment Indicator (examples):

The teacher may:

    • have the students simulate first aid responses and procedures;
    • review emergency response procedures by using written tests or verbal response scenarios for students;
    • have students make a list of emergency resources to include emergency phone numbers.

Curriculum Integration:

Physical Education 5.10

 

Standard 13: The student will understand the appropriate action to take when personal safety is threatened.

Learning Expectations:

The student will:

13.1 identify situations that should be reported to a trusted adult;

13.2 formulate a plan for self-protection skills and identify appropriate resources for help.

Performance Indicators:

At Level 1, the student will be able to:

  • list situations that threaten personal safety (e.g. home alone for an extended period of time);
  • describe self-protection skills that may be used when personal safety is threatened.

At Level 2, the student will be able to:

  • review types of abuse and evaluate appropriate resources for help.

At Level 3, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate high risk situations and safety precautions involving sexual offenses, suicide, possible abduction, abuse, neglect, and violence.

Teacher Assessment Indicator (examples):

The teacher may:

  • have students compile a list of personal safety threats and appropriate actions to take;
  • have students create a personal safety resource card listing telephone numbers of appropriate resources;
  • lead a class discussion of high-risk situations seen on television.

Curriculum Integration:

Computer Technology 2.4, 2.5; English/Language Arts 6.1.09j, 7.1.09j, 8.1.09j.


Substance Use and Abuse Prevention

Domain Description: The use of chemical substances can have both benefits and risks. Knowledge, attitudes, and personal choices can determine responsible behaviors towards the use of chemical substances, including the avoidance of alcohol and tobacco.

Standard 14: The student will understand appropriate and inappropriate uses of chemical substances.

Learning Expectations:

The student will:

14.1 distinguish between appropriate use and misuse of chemical substances for healthful living;

14.2 assess the influences of family, peers, and community on chemical substance use and abuse.

Performance Indicators:

At Level 1, the student will be able to:

  • identify a list of gateway drugs (e.g. marijuana and steroids);
  • list mood altering and addictive drugs (e.g. cocaine, ecstasy, etc.);
  • practice refusal skills.

At Level 2, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate appropriate use and the consequences of misuse of drugs by reading labels and instructions;
  • analyze peer and media influences regarding tobacco, alcohol, and illegal drug use.

At Level 3, the student will be able to:

  • explain the effects that gateway drugs have on one’s physical and mental health.

Teacher Assessment Indicator (examples):

The teacher may:

  • assist students with an Internet search to complete a vocabulary list of different substances followed by a matching test;
  • have students compile alcohol and tobacco magazine advertisements to identify media influences;
  • have students write an essay entitled "Why I Choose to Remain Drug Free".

Curriculum Integration:

Physical Science 13.1,13.2, 13.3; English/Language Arts 6.2.01f, 7.2.0c.

 

Standard 15: The student will understand the effects of substance use and abuse.

Learning Expectations:

The student will:

15.1 identify how substance (e.g. tobacco, alcohol, and drugs) use and abuse affects people physically, emotionally, socially, financially, and legally;

15.2 practice decision-making and refusal skills;

15.3 explain how choices relate to consequences.

Performance Indicators:

At Level 1, the student will be able to:

  • identify factors which contribute to tobacco, alcohol, and drug dependency.

At Level 2, the student will be able to:

  • describe the quality of a lifestyle free of tobacco, alcohol and drugs;
  • demonstrate awareness of school and community treatment and intervention resources for substance use and abuse;
  • assess the effects of substance use on the unborn child.

At Level 3, the student will be able to:

  • explain the effects of tobacco, alcohol, and drug use and abuse on self, family, and society.

Teacher Assessment Indicator (examples):

The teacher may:

  • have students interview two tobacco users to assess why they started using tobacco and why they continue to use tobacco products;
  • provide students warning labels from tobacco and alcohol products for evaluation and discussion;
  • have students write an essay entitled "What If I Got Caught".

Curriculum Integration:

English/Language Arts 6.2.13c


Environmental and Community Health

Domain Description: The health of the environment and community is directly impacted by responsible individual behavior. Public health and community services are essential to promote a healthy community.

Standard 16: The student will recognize environmental practices and products that affect personal and community health.

Learning Expectations:

The student will:

16.1 identify major environmental health concerns;

16.2 demonstrate ways to reduce, reuse, and recycle;

16.3 evaluate and critique products and their effects on the environment.

Performance Indicators:

At Level 1, the student will be able to:

  • list and explain environmental health concerns.

At Level 2, the student will be able to:

  • explain the concepts and processes involved in the terms reduce, reuse, and recycle;
  • demonstrate the concepts of reduce, reuse, and recycle in daily life.

At Level 3, the student will be able to:

  • analyze environmental concerns regarding landfills, oil spills, pollutants, chemical and biological warfare, and ergonomics.
  • Teacher Assessment Indicator (examples):

The teacher may:

  • have the students create a video promoting responsible environmental practices;
  • assist the students in developing a school wide recycling program;
  • assist students with an Internet search for information about environmental concerns.

Curriculum Integration:

Earth Science 10.3; Physical Science 3.1, 3,2; Computer Technology 5.1.

 

Standard 17: The student will be aware of and appropriately use community services that promote healthful living.

Learning Expectations:

The student will:

17.1 assess various health care facilities and services;

17.2 analyze the importance of community organizations to healthful living.

Performance Indicators:

At Level 1, the student will be able to:

  • name community healthcare resources and their purposes.

At Level 2, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate services and resources provided by community healthcare facilities (e.g. hospitals, nursing homes, public health departments, and YMCAs/YWCAs).

At Level 3, the student will be able to:

  • research careers in healthcare.

Teacher Assessment Indicator (examples):

The teacher may:

  • assist the students in compiling a list of community healthcare facilities;
  • have students develop and implement a survey of available community health services;
  • have students prepare a written healthcare career report.

Curriculum Integration:

Physical Education 4.1; Computer Technology 6.2; English/Language Arts 6.1.09, 7.1.09 a, 8.1.09a.


Consumer Health

Domain Description: According to the National Health Education Standards – Achieving Health Literacy, " accessing valid health-information and health-promoting products and services is important in the prevention, early detection, and treatment of most health problems. Critical thinking involves the ability to…access health-promoting services and products. Applying skills of information analysis…provides a foundation for individuals to become health literate and responsible, productive citizens".

Standard 18: The student will understand how culture, media, and technology impact consumer decisions about healthful living.

Learning Expectations:

The student will:

18.1 analyze how cultural diversity enriches and challenges individual and community health behaviors;

18.2 evaluate the effect of media and technology on individual, family, and community health.

Performance Indicators:

At Level 1, the student will be able to:

  • explain how culture, media, and technology influence personal and family choices concerning health products.

At Level 2, the student will be able to:

  • differentiate between effective and non-effective health products, their uses, and services.

At Level 3, the student will be able to:

  • identify valid and reliable informational medical resources on the Internet.

Teacher Assessment Indicator (examples):

The teacher may:

  • have students list five healthcare products in their homes;
  • have students analyze misleading advertisements of products that adolescents might purchase;
  • have students construct a poster listing five consumer tips obtained from medical consumer reports.

Curriculum Integration:

Physical Education 1.6, 3.10, 4.10, 5.8; English/Language Arts 6.1.09a, b c, h, j, k, 7.1.09a, b, c, h, j, k, 8.1.09a, b, c, f, j, k; Computer Technology 5.4; Social Studies 2.3.

 

Standard 19: The student will demonstrate the ability to access valid health information and health-promoting products and services.

Learning Expectations:

The student will:

19.1 identify and analyze valid reliable health information, products, and services;

19.2 analyze the use of various health products, services, and health resources.

Performance Indicators:

At Level 1, the student will be able to:

  • name personal healthcare providers;

At Level 2, the student will be able to:

  • identify school and community health information resources (e.g. parents, school nurses, school counselors, teachers, hotlines, and medical/mental health providers).

At Level 3, the student will be able to:

  • construct a school and community healthcare resource booklet;
  • compare and contrast the benefits of a consumer health product and/or service.

Teacher Assessment Indicator (examples):

The teacher may:

  • invite healthcare providers to participate in a question and answer forum;
  • have students prepare a current list of healthcare hotline numbers;
  • have student groups create a new or existing healthcare product commercial.

Curriculum Integration:

English/Language Arts 6.1.09c, j; 7.1.09c, j; 8.1.09 c, j, 8.2.12d, g; Computer Technology 5.4.

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Lifetime Wellness

Grades 9 - 12

The content of the course includes seven standards: Disease Prevention and Control, Nutrition, Substance Use and Abuse, Mental/Emotional/Social Health, Sexuality and Family Life, Safety and First Aid and Personal Fitness. Each content area is addressed in a classroom and/or physical activity setting.  Personal fitness and nutrition should be emphasized and integrated throughout the course.  Students are provided opportunities to explore how content areas are interrelated. Students acquire knowledge and skills necessary to make informed decisions regarding their health and well-being throughout their lifetime.

Standard Number:  1.0 Disease Prevention and Control

Girls Health

HIV / AIDS Password Game

Abstinence Lesson Plan

HIV Transmission Game

 

Standard:

The student will identify the causes, signs and symptoms, treatments and prevention of communicable and non-communicable diseases related to total wellness and health maintenance.

Learning Expectations:

The student will:

  • 1.1 differentiate communicable and non-communicable diseases.
    • (Linkage: 6.8)
  • 1.2 determine heredity, environmental and lifestyle factors which place the student at risk for disease.
    • (Linkage: 3.4, 3.5, 3.10, 3.11, 6.10, 6.11, 7.2, 7.3)
  • 1.3 describe different types of pathogens and how they affect health.
    • (Linkage: 6.8, 6.12, 7.2, 7.3)
  • 1.4 explain causes, modes of transmission, signs and symptoms, treatments and prevention of Communicable diseases (e.g., STIs, HIV/AIDS, mononucleosis).
    • (Linkage: 6.8, 6.10, 6.12, 7.2, 7.3)
  • 1.5 explain causes, signs and symptoms, treatments and prevention of non-communicable diseases (e.g., obesity, Type I and Type II diabetes, asthma, heart disease).
    • (Linkage: 3.4, 3.11)
  • 1.6 identify appropriate community agencies providing resources for disease treatment, information and support (e.g., local health department, American Red Cross, American Lung Association, American Heart Association, American Cancer Society, local Crisis Pregnancy Center).
    • (Linkage: 7.4)
  • 1.7  recognize the need for annual physical exams.                                                                 
    • (Linkage 3.4, 3.5, 3.11, 4.6, 6.5)
  • 1.8  identify the physician as a community resource and discuss ways to locate a physician. (e.g., local health departments, insurance provider lists, hospitals, clinics)

Performance Indicators:

At Level 1, the student will:

  • review vocabulary (e.g., disease, communicable disease, non-communicable disease, obesity, pathogens, diabetes, asthma, hypertension, hepatitis, immunity, vaccine, STI, HIV/AIDS).
  • list common communicable and non-communicable diseases.
  • describe behaviors and preventative measures to control the spread of communicable disease.

At Level 2, the student will:

  • list and define the types of pathogens that cause communicable disease (e.g., virus, bacteria, fungi).
  • describe how a person can protect himself/herself against the spread of pathogens.
  • differentiate the symptoms of the common cold, allergies and the flu.
  • identify modes of transmission, signs and symptoms and treatment of STIs. 
  • discuss healthy behaviors for avoiding STIs.
  • differentiate HIV and AIDS.
  • describe risk factors and warning signs of cancer, heart disease, hypertension, diabetes and obesity.
  • determine when to seek medical care.
  • research available community health resources.
  • describe the role of immunizations in the prevention of various diseases (e.g., flu, hepatitis, meningitis, measles, mumps, rubella).

At Level 3, the student will:

  • define immune system, T-cells, B-cells and antibodies.
  • outline the immune system’s response to a pathogen.
  • categorize STIs as bacterial,  parasitic or viral pathogens.
  • discuss risk factors associated with an unhealthy lifestyle.
  • discuss the effects of STIs on total wellness.

Sample Task #1:

Diabetes

The purpose of this activity is to identify responsibilities that each individual has toward diabetes control and prevention.

  1. Compareand contrast Type I and Type II diabetes. (include causes, body’s usage of insulin, treatment)
  2. Research the long-term effects of diabetes on an individual.  (medical treatment, socio-economic impact)
  3. Have each student assess his/her likelihood of developing Type I or Type II diabetes.

Sample Task #2:

HIV or Other STI Transmission Activity

The purpose of this activity is to demonstrate how one person infected with an STI, HIV or AIDS can put a large number of people at risk for contracting disease.

  1. Give each student a 3" x 5" card.
  2. Students are given three minutes to obtain the signature of several classmates.
  3. One card has a small "x" on the back identifying that person as being infected with an HIV or another STI.
  4. The owner of the "x" card is identified and asked to list the names found on the "x" card as those individuals stand.
  5. Each student identified on the "x" card writes the students’ names found on his/her card until all who have directly or indirectly made contact with the "x" person are listed.

Integration

Biology, Sociology, Psychology, Technology


Standard Number    2.0 Mental, Emotional and Social Health

OCD Information

Phobias

Glencoe Stress Test

Brain Pop: Food Safety

Family Values Lesson

Standard:

The student will acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to make informed decisions regarding their mental, emotional and social well-being.

Learning Expectations:

The student will:

  • 2.1 identify and describe Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs.
    • (Linkage: 3.4, 6.2)
  • 2.2 describe characteristics of mental, emotional and social health.
    • (Linkage: 6.1)
  • 2.3 identify various emotions and their effects on the mind and body.
    • (Linkage: 1.5, 6.12, 7.6)
  • 2.4 explain how to develop and maintain a positive self-concept and high self-esteem.
    • (Linkage: 4.8, 6.2, 6.12, 7.2, 7.6, 7.7)
  • 2.5 list the factors that affect personality development.
    • (Linkage: 6.2, 6.3, 7.2)
  • 2.6 recognize stressors and formulate personal stress management techniques.
    • (Linkage: 1.5, 4.8, 6.12, 7.2, 7.7)
  • 2.7 identify and practice coping, negotiation, delaying and refusal skills.
    • (Linkage: 5.2b, 6.7, 6.10, 6.12, 7.5)
  • 2.8 describe stages of the grief process.
    • (Linkage: 1.5)
  • 2.9 identify positive ways of resolving interpersonal conflict.
    • (Linkage: 5.2b, 6.1, 6.7, 6.10)
  • 2.10 recognize the signs of potential suicide.
  • 2.11 examine characteristics of mental disorders.
    • (Linkage: 3.5, 6.2, 7.2, 7.3, 7.6)
    • a.  anxiety disorders (e.g., phobias, obsessive-compulsive, panic, post-traumatic stress disorders).
    • b.  affective disorders (e.g., clinical depression, bipolar disorder).
    • c.  personality disorders (e.g., anti-social personality disorder, passive-aggressive personality disorder, schizophrenia).
    • d.   eating disorders (e.g., anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa)
  • 2.12 identify community resources providing information for mental health and suicide prevention.
    • (Linkage: 1.6, 7.4)

Performance Indicators:

At Level 1, the student will:

  • review vocabulary (e.g., self-esteem, self-concept, personality, defense mechanism, stressor, stress).
  • define mental, emotional and social health.
  • list characteristics of good mental, emotional and social health.
  • identify various emotions.
  • list personal stressors.
  • list warning signs for suicide.
  • distinguish positive and negative ways to resolve interpersonal conflicts.

At Level 2, the student will:

  • explain Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs.
  • identify characteristics of positive support groups. 
  • examine the effects of various emotions on the mind and body.
  • list factors that shape personality.
  • examine ways to develop a positive self-concept and self-esteem.
  • explain the contributions of heredity, environment and personal behavior to the development of an individual’s personality.
  • discuss signs, symptoms and treatment for depression.
  • describe the fight or flight response.
  • describe personal stress management techniques.
  • identify the stages of grief. 
  • practice strategies to follow during conflict resolution.
  • identify and demonstrate suicide prevention communication skills.
  • list resources for mental health assistance.

At Level 3, the student will:

  • design a plan to improve self-concept.
  • discuss the physiological changes which occur during the fight or flight response.
  • explain how defense mechanisms are used to deal with stressful situations.
  • participate in peer mediation.

Sample Task #1:

Practice Non-abusive Behavior with Others

The purpose of this activity is to have students work cooperatively to find acceptable ways for their peers to “let off steam”.

  1. Role-play conflict situations.  Have students react in an abusive manner and then change the ending to a more productive solution.
  2. Working in small groups, have each student identify a conflict they continually have with another person (parent, sibling, friend, teacher, etc.) that they would like to change.  Give each other ideas on how to resolve personal conflicts. 

Sample Task #2:

Looking For The Good

The purpose of this activity is to assist students in building self-esteem by demonstrating how to look for good qualities in others as well as themselves.

  1. Provide one zip lock bag per student.
  2. Inside each bag is a colored card that reads "I am special" and a stack of blank white cards equal to the number of students in the class.
  3. Students write one anonymous, positive comment about each person in the class.
  4. The students’ comments may relate to physical characteristics, friendship, extra-curricular activities, class work, special abilities, etc.
  5. Students travel around the room placing the comment card for each fellow student in the bag lying on that student’s desk.
  6. Once completed, each student reads the cards in their bag silently and volunteers comments publicly.

Integration

Biology, Psychology, Sociology, Literature


Standard Number:    3.0 Nutrition

What’s the Right Weight for my Height?

Food Guide Pyramid

Healthy Girls Food Guide Pyramid

Myths About Acne

Old Wives Tales

Is Smoking a Good Way to Manage Weight?

Thanksgiving Calorie Counter

BMI Calculator

Nutrition Tips for Families

Diabetes Prevention

Standard:

The student will assess the effects of nutritional choices and incorporate strategies that contribute to an improved quality of life.

Learning Expectations:

The student will:

  • 3.1 identify the six classes of nutrients and describe their functions.
  • 3.2 evaluate personal nutritional and energy needs.
    • (Linkage: 4.5a)
  • 3.3 compare and contrast dietary guidelines (e.g., USDA, Mayo, Harvard).
  • 3.4 identify the relationship between healthy eating and total wellness
    • (Linkage: 1.2, 1.5, 2.1, 4.6, 6.5, 6.12, 7.7)
  • 3.5 discuss eating disorders and their effects on the total wellness of the individual.
    • (Linkage: 1.2, 2.11)
  • 3.6 assess personal daily dietary practices to each of the categories to the current USDA Food Guide Pyramid.
  • 3.7 interpret information provided on food labels.
  • 3.8 identify “fad diets” and their impact on total wellness.
  • 3.9 describe food safety including food storage, cooking and sanitation.
    • (Linkage: 5.1)
  • 3.10 identify factors that influence food choices (e.g., culture, family/friends, advertising, time and money, emotions, taste, spiritual beliefs).
    • (Linkage: 1.2, 6.2)
  • 3.11 examine the relationship between diet and disease (e.g., obesity, hypertension, diabetes, elevated cholesterol levels).
    • (Linkage: 1.2, 1.5)

Performance Indicators:

At Level 1, the student will:

  • review vocabulary (e.g., nutrition, diet, nutrients, calorie, carbohydrates, fats, proteins, vitamins, minerals, atherosclerosis, cholesterol, fiber, high density lipoproteins (HDL), low density lipoproteins (LDL), hypertension, cardiovascular disease, obesity, diabetes, osteoporosis, cancer, plaque, overweight, underweight).
  • label the categories in the current USDA Food Guide Pyramid.
  • identify eating disorders (e.g., anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, binge eating).
  • compare healthy and unhealthy foods.

At Level 2, the student will:

  • list and describe the six nutrient classifications.
  • identify the three nutrients that provide the body with energy (i.e., fats, carbohydrates, proteins).
  • examine factors influencing diet.
  • identify food sources for each of the classifications of nutrients.
  • define each eating disorder and the resulting effects on the body .
  • calculate food and energy needs (e.g., caloric need, actual caloric intake and use).
  • design a daily menu that meets the goals of the current USDA Food Guide Pyramid.
  • describe problems associated with popular fad diets.
  • interpret information provided on food labels.
  • recognize and assess the effects of advertisements on food choices.
  • analyze the relationship between food choices and diseases (e.g., obesity, diabetes, elevated cholesterol levels, colon cancer, hypertension, osteoporosis).
  • analyze fast foods and snacks (e.g., fat grams, sugar content, caloric content)

At Level 3, the student will:

  • analyze the current recommended daily allowance (RDA) guidelines.
  • establish the connection between saturated fats and cholesterol with heart disease.
  • discuss psychological implications associated with eating disorders.
  • assess food safety and handling procedures.

Sample Task #1:

Nutritious Food Party

The purpose of this activity is to allow students the opportunity to socialize while eating healthy foods.

  1. Several days before the Nutritious Food Party, ask students to sign-up to bring one type of nutritious food for their class party.  Provide a list of nutritious foods from which students can select. 
  2. It is not necessary for students to bring enough of their nutritious food for everyone in the class (e.g., if a student selects to bring small bottles of water, he/she should bring six or less, rather than 30).
  3. Keep the foods for each class separate to ensure you have enough food for each class (e.g., keep all 1st period food together, all 5th period food together).
  4. Ensure you have refrigerators available for cold items (e.g., low-fat milk, low sugar juice).
  5. On the day of the party, ask students to bring all foods to your room before they report to their 1st period class.  This will give you time to set up the food for the party prior to the arrival of each class.

Sample Task #2

Fat Content

The purpose of this activity is to show the fat content of different foods.

  1. Provide various kinds of food for students to identify (e.g., apple, peanut butter, catsup, potato chips, candy, luncheon meat, cookies, green beans).
  2. Rub small amounts of each food on a brown paper bag.
  3. Allow paper to dry and see what happens.
  4. Help them conclude that food with fat leaves a spot, the more fat in the food the denser the spot and foods without fat will dry without leaving a spot.

Integration

Science, Consumer Science, Math, Art, Social Studies, History


Standard Number:  4.0 Personal Fitness

Everyday Activities Power Point

 How Much Water Do I Need?

Walking Calories Calculator

Standard:

The student will acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to achieve and maintain a health-enhancing level of personal fitness.

Learning Expectations:

The student will:

  • 4.1 identify and define concepts of physical fitness
    • a.  identify and describe the health-related components of physical fitness (i.e., cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength, muscular endurance, flexibility, body composition).
    • b.  identify and describe the skill-related components of physical fitness (i.e., balance, reaction time, speed, power, agility, coordination).
  • 4.2 identify the anatomy and the functions of the muscular, skeletal and cardiovascular systems.
    • (Linkage: 7.2)
  • 4.3 describe and apply principles related to physical activity. 
    • a. describe and demonstrate proper warm-up and cool-down procedures when participating in physical activity.
    • b. define the training principles of overload, progression, and specificity.
    • c. describe the F.I.T.T. (frequency, intensity, time and type) principle.
    • d. calculate resting, target and maximum heart rate as it relates to personal fitness planning.
  • 4.4 apply proper safety practices when participating in physical activity.
    • (Linkage: 5.1, 5.2c, 5.2d, 7.2)
  • 4.5 analyze and engage in physical activities that are developmentally appropriate and support achievement of personal fitness and activity goals.
    • a. assess individual health-related fitness levels by measuring flexibility, cardiovascular  endurance, muscular strength, muscular endurance and body composition using appropriate methods.
      • (Linkage: 3.2)
    • b.  design a personal fitness plan and set goals based on the health-related fitness assessment results that will lead to, or maintain, a satisfactory fitness level.
    • c. select aerobic and anaerobic activities needed for successful participation in lifetime activities (e.g., aerobic walking, circuit training, cycling, dance aerobics,             racquet activities, rhythmic movement, rock climbing, rope jumping, rowing, running, skating, snow skiing, step aerobics, strength training, swimming, water   aerobics).
    • d.  demonstrate improvement in the health-related fitness components.
      • (Linkage: 2.4, 6.2, 7.6)
  • 4.6 list the health problems associated with inadequate levels of health-related fitness.
    • (Linkage: 1.2, 1.5, 3.4, 6.12, 7.6)
  • 4.7 distinguish between facts and fallacies as related to fitness products, services and marketing.
  • 4.8 discuss the social, emotional, physical and mental benefits associated with participation in physical fitness activities.
    • (Linkage: 2.4, 2.6, 6.12, 7.3, 7.7)
  • 4.9 identify resources and facilities in the community that promote physical fitness and wellness.

Performance Indicators:

At Level 1, the student will:

  • review vocabulary (e.g., aerobic, anaerobic, metabolism, target heart rate, warm-up, cool down, F.I.T.T., physical fitness, health-related fitness components, skills-related fitness components).
  • list and define the health-related components of fitness (i.e., cardiovascular endurance, muscular endurance, muscular strength, flexibility, body composition).
  • list and define the skill-related components of fitness (i.e., power, agility, balance, speed, coordination, reaction time).
  • differentiate health-related and skill-related fitness.

At Level 2, the student will:

  • describe the social, mental, emotional and physical benefits of being physically fit.
  • differentiate aerobic and anaerobic exercise and provide examples of each.
  • design a personal fitness plan.
  • compare a physically fit person to a sedentary person (e.g., body weight, mental health, blood pressure, life expectancy).
  • examine popular fitness products (e.g., shoes, clothing, equipment, foods, sports drinks, facilities).
  • define and differentiate isometric, isotonic and isokinetic exercises.
  • calculate resting, maximum and target heart rates.
  • recognize and apply proper warm-up and cool-down procedures associated with exercise.
  • differentiate moderate and high intensity exercises and give examples of each.
  • practice skills associated with different cardiovascular activities.
  • examine common injuries associated with exercise.
  • identify the major muscles of the muscular system.
  • identify the bones of the skeletal system.
  • identify the parts of the heart and describe how blood circulates through the heart.

At Level 3, the student will:

  • analyze a friend’s exercise plan and make suggestions for improvement.
  • discuss how steroids affect the body.
  • identify biomechanical principles of the health components of fitness.

Sample Task #1:

Resting Heart Rate, Maximum Heart Rate and Target (Working) Heart Rate

Resting heart rate (RHR): To determine resting heart rate, count pulse at carotid or brachial site.  Take three readings and average.

Time 1 (T1) = _____________   Time 2 (T2) = _____________   Time 3 (T3) = _____________

Average all time trials (Avg.)   (add all time trials and divide by 3)

T1 _____________  +  T2 _____________  +  T3  =  Total _____________

Total  _____________ ÷  3  =  Avg.  _____________

Maximum Heart Rate (MHR) Never exercise heart at maximum heart rate during any exercise period.

              220 – your age  = Maximum Heart Rate.

              220 –  _____________ =  MHR _____________

Target Heart Rate (THR)  This is the range in which you should exercise to benefit from cardiovascular activity.

              Maximum Heart Rate  x   .70 = Low End of Target Heart Rate

              MHR _____________ x  .70  =  THR _____________ (low end of range)

              Maximum Heart Rate  x  .85  =  High end of Target Heart Rate

              MHR _____________ x  .85  =  THR _____________ (high end of range)

Sample Task #2:

Differentiating Moderate Intensity and High Intensity Exercise

The purpose of the activity is to differentiate moderate intensity from high intensity exercise by comparing heart rates.

  1. Each student must find their individual resting heart rate.
  2. The students walk one lap on a ¼ mile course at their own pace.
  3. Upon completion of the lap, the students should take their individual heart rates either with a heart rate monitor or counting the pulse from the carotid artery.
  4. Repeat procedure with students running one lap at their own pace on the same ¼ mile course.
  5. Compare the difference between heart rates and discuss the reasons for the differences.
  6. As an additional assignment, post a chart displaying the number of calories burned during various forms of exercise and have the students determine the calories used during the walk and the run.
  7. As an option, increase the exercise time to 12 minutes, increasing intensity each class session:
    1. students can calculate and chart resting heart rate, maximum heart rate, and target heart rate zone for most efficient burning of calories, and
    2. by using a ¼ mile track divided into 10ths of a mile by using cones numbered 1-10, students can determine pace; hand one straw per lap to each student to aid in lap counting; pace can be determined by counting the number of complete laps to the neatest tenth of a mile and dividing that figure into 12 minutes (ex.: running six laps or 1.5 miles in 12 minutes converts to an 8-minute pace).

Integration

Math, Science


Standard Number:  5.0 Safety and First-Aid

American Red Cross

Standard:

The student will acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to recognize, respond and apply appropriate procedures to accidental and life-threatening situations.

Learning Expectations:

The student will:

  • 5.1 identify hazardous and life-threatening situations and the consequences of each.
    • (Linkage: 3.5, 3.9, 4.4, 7.1, 7.6)
  • 5.2 explain how individual attitudes and behaviors affect personal safety and the safety of others.
    • a.  identify potential hazards associated with technology (e.g., internet, cell phones, digital cameras, video games).
    • b. analyze and apply strategies to avoid or manage conflict associated with school violence and bullying (e.g., harassment, name calling, teasing, exploitation, physical contact).
      • (Linkage: 2.7, 2.9, 6.10, 7.2)
    • c.  recognize and apply personal safety guidelines regarding modes of transportation (e.g., automobile, motorcycle, bicycle, all-terrain vehicles, marine vehicles, skateboards, utility vehicles).
      • (Linkage: 4.4)
    • d.  identify dangers associated with participating in high-risk behaviors (e.g., misuse of firearms, not using safety equipment including seatbelts, impaired driving).
      • (Linkage: 4.4, 7.2)
  • 5.3 identify and demonstrate the skills necessary in responding to medical emergencies.
  • 5.4 describe and demonstrate proper first aid techniques for common injuries.
  • 5.5 identify and demonstrate the steps for aiding a choking victim.
  • 5.6 explain and demonstrate the steps used in administering Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR), rescue breathing and the use of an Automated External Defibrillator (AED).

Performance Indicators:

At Level 1, the student will

  • review vocabulary (e.g., first-aid, CPR, AED, rescue breathing, predator, exploitation, wounds, shock, Heimlich maneuver, ABC’s: airway, breathing, circulation, severe bleeding).
  • list situations considered to be emergencies (e.g., breathing problems, severe bleeding, broken bone, chest pain).
  • identify the relationship between attitudes and safety behavior.
  • identify safe and unsafe behaviors.
  • list guidelines for using 911 (e.g., caller’s name, location, number of victims, condition of victims).

At Level 2, the student will:

  • distinguish CPR and rescue breathing.
  • identify signs and symptoms of life-threatening and non-life-threatening situations (e.g., stroke, seizures, heart attack, asthma attack, sprains).
  • describe first-aid treatment involved in treating common injuries.
  • role play first-aid procedures for life threatening and non-life-threatening situations.
  • simulate steps for aiding a choking victim.
  • simulate steps for administering CPR and using an AED.
  • describe ways to avoid being susceptible to exploitation (e.g., internet predators, child pornography, inappropriate physical and/or emotional contact).
  • list appropriate and inappropriate usage of technology (internet, cell phones).
  • evaluate the consequences of participating in high-risk behaviors.
  • describe and role play the relationships among attitudes, behaviors, vulnerability to violence and the prevention of violence.
  • design a disaster plan.

At Level 3, the student will:

  • earn certification for First-Aid, CPR and AED.
  • create first-aid kit.
  • create safety infomercials.

Sample Task #1:

Risky Behavior

The purpose of this activity is to identify reasons why people take unnecessary risks.

  1. Students will develop a list of risk taking behaviors.
  2. Discuss the concept of an accident-prone personality.
  3. Students will role play high risk behaviors and the steps needed for the prevention of accidents.

Sample Task #2:

Role Play Emergency Situations

The purpose of this activity is to have students react appropriately to an emergency situation while role playing.

  1. Prepare several different task cards each with a specific emergency (e.g., a bicycle accident, heart attack, seizure, ankle sprain, fractured leg, automobile accident, potential drowning, contact by predator), and a specific setting (e.g., mountains, playground, home, lake, highway).
  2. Each student randomly picks a card and role plays the appropriate first aid procedure explaining each step along the way.

Sample Task #3:

First Aid Kit

The purpose of this activity is for all students to create their own first-aid kit.

  1. All kits will be graded (see grading sheet at the bottom of the task or create your own grading scale).
  2. All kits will be returned to students after being graded.
  3. Students shall not bring items in their first-aid kits that are not allowed at school (e.g., Tylenol).

First Aid Kit

Due Date: ______________

  • It is not mandatory that you spend any money on this project.
  • Look around your house for items you may already have. 
  • You may share items with classmates.
  • Choose a container large enough in which to put 25 first aid items.
  • A medium tackle box will work well.  It contains compartments in which to place different items.
  • All items must be labeled and in a container of some type.
    • Exceptions (scissors, tweezers, flashlight)
  • You must label the outside of your first aid kit with the following information
    • “First Aid Kit”
    • Your name
    • Non-emergency phone number 862-8600
  • You must turn your first aid kit in ___________________.
  • You are not allowed to put Tylenol, Advil, aspirin, cough medicine, etc. in your first aid kit.

The following items are only suggestions and not mandatory

  • Bandaids (variety of sizes) (however, only counts as one item)
  • Rubber gloves
  • Breathing barrier
  • Sterile gauze pads
  • Q-tips
  • Alcohol pads (wipes)
  • Zip Lock bags
  • Triangular bandage
  • Calamine lotion
  • Safety pins
  • Paper/pen
  • Cotton balls
  • Thermometer
  • Sting relief gel
  • Ice pack (chemically activated)
  • Tweezers
  • Small scissors
  • Antibacterial soap (or hand wipes)
  • Antiseptic towelettes
  • Gauze tape
  • Eye wash
  • Sterile eye pads
  • Rubbing alcohol (small plastic bottles)
  • Peroxide  (small plastic bottles)
  • Burn cream
  • Aloe gel (sunburn relief)

 

First Aid Kit

Checklist for Grading

______”First Aid Kit,” Name, and Non-emergency phone number on kit (5 points)

______25 items    (3 points each)

______Organization of items in container (10 points)

______Appropriate sized container (5 points)

______Durable container (5 points)

Integration:

Biology, Math, Driver Education, Drama


Standard Number:  6.0 Sexuality and Family Life

PBS: “That’s My Line” Lesson Plan

Teenage Growth ages 15-17

Choose Today:  3 visual Abstinence Presentations

Reproductive System Diagrams

Reproduction 101 Lesson

Standard:

The student will examine human sexuality (e.g., biology, behavior, responsibilities, attitudes) and recognize the influence of society and family values on decision making.

Learning Expectations:

The student will:

  • 6.1  define the aspects of positive relationships (e.g., family, dating, friendship, professional, community).
  • 6.2  examine the influence of families, cultural traditions and economic factors on human development (e.g., personality, values, sexuality, self-esteem).
  • 6.3  describe gender differences, expectations and biases often encountered in today’s society and compare them to the past.
  • 6.4  explain human reproduction (i.e., male and female reproductive systems, pregnancy).
  • 6.5  Recognize the skills necessary for maintaining reproductive health (e.g., self-examinations, annual doctor visits, prenatal care).
  • 6.6  recognize abstinence from all sexual activity as a positive choice.
  • 6.7  identify and practice skills needed to resist persuasive tactics regarding sexual activity.
  • 6.8  identify the potential outcomes of engaging in sexual behaviors (e.g., pregnancy, STIs including HIV/AIDS, emotional).,
  • 6.9  compare various contraceptive methods.
  • 6.10  identify short-term and long-term effects of sexual harassment and date rape.
  • 6.11  discuss the alternatives of an unplanned pregnancy (e.g., adoption, single parenting, marriage, abortion).
  • 6.12  discuss Tennessee Code Annotated 68-11-255, Procedure for surrendering custody of unwanted infant without criminal liability.   http://michie.lexisnexis.com/tennessee/lpext.dll?f=templates&fn=main-h.htm&cp
  • 6.13  discuss the consequences associated with teen pregnancy (e.g., physical, mental, emotional, social, economical).
  • 6.14  examine the lifelong responsibilities and requirements of parenthood.

Performance Indicators:

At Level 1, the student will:

  • review vocabulary (e.g., abstinence, relationship, friendship, dating, date rape, puberty, sexual activity, reproduction, reproductive system, sexually transmitted infections, sexual harassment).
  • examine the positive outcomes pertaining to abstinence.
  • review the characteristics of puberty.
  • list and discuss different family structures.
  • recognize the effects of media and marketing in forming attitudes toward sexual activity.

At Level 2, the student will:

  • state factors contributing to a positive relationship (e.g., trust, honesty, caring, consideration, loyalty, communication).
  • recognize that abstinence from all sexual activity is the healthiest choice.
  • discuss reasons for abstaining from all sexual activity.
  • identify the anatomy and functions of the male and female reproductive systems.
  • identify disorders of the male and female reproductive systems.
  • identify proper care of the male and female reproductive system.
  • explain the menstrual cycle (e.g., hormonal changes, ovulation, uterine lining changes, menstrual period).
  • identify signs of pregnancy.
  • describe tests used to determine pregnancy (i.e., blood, urine).
  • describe the stages of fetal development.
  • discuss hormones and their effects on body changes.
  • provide examples of positive peer pressure and negative peer pressure and manipulation.
  • practice refusal skills using verbal and nonverbal tactics.
  • research teen pregnancy statistics and issues.
  • define contraception.
  • identify and discuss contraceptive methods.
  • identify causes, modes of transmission, treatment and prevention measures associated with STIs, including HIV/AIDS.

At Level 3, the student will:

  • discuss the process of heredity relative to human reproduction.
  • discuss the future of genetics and its influence on reproduction.

Sample Task #1:

Resisting Pressure Brainstorm

Divide the class into sx small groups.  Ask each of the groups to brainstorm ways to refuse sexual involvement as follows:

  • Groups 1 & 4: Ways to resist/refuse using words/verbal communication
  • Groups 2 & 5: Ways to resist/refuse using body language/nonverbal communication
  • Groups 3 & 6: Ways to resist/refuse using actions/behaviors

Verbal Communication

Nonverbal

Behavior

No

serious facial expression 

turn on lights

I’m not ready now

cross arms over chest

get around other people

Don’t pressure me

stand-up

get something to eat/distract

Sample Task #2:

Life Plans

The purpose of this activity is to allow students to explore and discuss the changes necessitated by parenthood to short-term and long-term life plans.

  1. Have each student list the following on paper:
    1. his or her plans for later that day,
    2. his or her plans for the upcoming weekend,
    3. where they will go on their next vacation,
    4. where they want to be and what they want to be doing a year from today,
    5. where they want to be and what they want to be doing five years from today.
  2. Students should list the changes unexpected parenthood would bring to those plans.
  3. Have a class discussion on the various plans and the changes that would occur.

Integration

Biology, Math, Home Economics, Drama


Standard Number:  7.0 Substance Use and Abuse

Close to Home Comic Book

Smoking Cigarettes to Loose Weight

Brain on Drugs

CDC: Smoking & Tobacco Use

Standard:

The student will differentiate appropriate and inappropriate use of chemical substances.

Learning Expectations:

The student will:

  • 7.1 describe the illegal use of alcohol, tobacco and other chemical substances.
  • 7.2 identify the effects of substance misuse and abuse on society (e.g., school, crime, disease, pregnancy, STI, job, personal relationships, physical enhancement, athletic performance).
  • 7.3 recognize that combining chemical substances can have serious consequences (e.g., death, injury, sensory impairments).
  • 7.4 identify school and community resources for treatment and intervention (e.g., DARE, school counselor, teacher, local health department, hotlines, Alcoholics Anonymous).
  • 7.5 identify strategies to avoid misuse of chemical substances.
  • 7.6 explain the effects of chemical substances on total wellness.
  • 7.7 list the benefits of a lifestyle free from chemical misuse.

Performance Indicators:

At Level 1, the student will:

  • review vocabulary (e.g., substance abuse, illicit drugs, gateway drugs, misuse, abuse, OTC, prescription, steroids, drug interaction, tar, nicotine, carbon monoxide, blood alcohol level, co-dependency, enabling).
  • distinguish between over-the-counter and prescription drugs.
  • list reasons individuals might use tobacco products and alcohol.
  • describe behaviors and practice refusal skills necessary to resist peer pressure.
  • identify consequences of substance misuse (e.g., legal, physical, social, emotional).

At Level 2, the student will:

  • discuss legal issues of buying and consuming alcohol and tobacco.
  • explain the effects of chemical substances on behavior (e.g., alcohol, prescription medication, methamphetamine, gasoline, paint, glue, aerosols).
  • describe physiological (e.g., brain, liver, fetus, central nervous system) effects of substance use.
  • list effects of alcoholism (e.g., physical, social, economic).
  • identify smokeless tobacco products and their effects (e.g. cancer, gingivitis, tooth decay, discoloration of teeth).
  • discuss effects of secondhand smoke.
  • discuss media influences on tobacco, alcohol and substance use.
  • list the classifications of drugs and give examples of each (e.g., depressants, stimulants, hallucinogens, narcotics, inhalants, designer drugs, performance-enhancing drugs).
  • discuss and explain harmful effects of methamphetamine on individuals and society (e.g., families, socioeconomic impact, health, environment, government funding).
  • discuss risks associated with alcohol consumption (e.g., DWI, DUI, riding with an impaired driver, cirrhosis, alcohol poisoning, underage drinking, sexual activity).
  • discuss risks associated with substance use and misuse (e.g., death, overdose, sensory impairment).

At Level 3, the student will:

  • identify programs designed to treat alcoholism and substance abuse.
  • debate laws relative to alcohol, tobacco, and other chemical substances.

Sample Task #1

Alternative Party

The purpose of this activity is to have students will identify non-alcoholic ways to entertain and/or have fun. Each student will (1) List 10 things they do for fun and enjoyment (2) Learn how to make at least one non-alcoholic beverage, and (3) Learn how to play a group game (4) Plan a party for their friends.

Introduction: Open discussion about why people drink, the effects of drinking. Talk about alcohol as a social lubricant and how it alters mood and impairs ability to function properly.

Step 1: Have each student write 10 ways they have fun. They have to be legal and cannot harm others in any manner. Have the class combine their examples until you have 101 ways. A fun idea is to compile their combined responses into a handout to give each of them entitled "101 non-alcoholic ways to have fun."

Step 2: Divide into pre-assigned groups and hand out recipes that you as the teacher supply. You could also have each group come up with their own favorite drink recipe in advance as an option which works great and gives the students ownership rights. Each group should have a blender and a different recipe. Groups should make enough drinks to share with the entire class so that everyone receives a taste of each drink. A compiled sheet of drink recipes should be made and given to each of the students entitled ‘Tasty Drink Recipes for an Absolutely Sober Party.’

Step 3: Each group should be assigned a couple of days in advance to come up with a group game to teach and play with the entire class. This provides students with yet another non-alcoholic way to have fun. Students are responsible for teaching and providing any necessary equipment needed for the game. Each group should also prepare a handout for each student in the class with the name of their game, the rules, and instructions on how to play. Assess each group using a scoring rubric based on elements you established with the assignment, i.e. creativity/originality, fun factor, group involvement, clear rules and instructions, etc.

Step 4: Clean-Up/Closure. Debrief with students on the activity getting their valuable feedback, insights, and comments.

Sample Task #2:

Drug Combo

The purpose of this activity is to recognize that combining chemical substances can have serious consequences.

  • The student will identify several famous personalities who have lost their lives or their lives have been altered as the result of the abuse of substance combinations.
  • Have students develop a chart showing the stages of becoming a substance abuser.
  • As a group, have students develop a collage of positive alternatives to substance use.

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