Language Arts and the  World We Live In

 

 Gateway Language Arts

Gateway Language Arts

  Comprehensive Site for Gateway Review: Links for each skill, practice tests, excellent link!

Comprehensive site for English 9 EOC Review

Standard Number:

 

1.0     Writing

Grammar / writing rules and help

Excellent PowerPoint on effective writing  

 

   

Performance Indicators

Reporting As documented through state assessment  -

State:

Category  

 

A

 

 

A

 

 

A

 

A

 

 

A

 

 

A

 

A

 

 

A

 

 

A

 

 

 

 

A

 

GC

 

 

C

 

 

C

 

C

 

 

C

 

 

C

 

WC

 

 

WC

 

 

WC

 

 

 

 

O

At Level 1, the student is able to

          combine sentences using a comma and coordinating conjunction or correct a run-on sentence within a writing sample;

Sentence Combining Rules and Three Quizzes

          distinguish fact from opinion from a passage or writing sample;

MLK activity / Fact or Opinion worksheet

Great explanation and interactive worksheet

          identify the targeted audience for a selected passage;

Identifying target audience activity

          choose the sentence that relates the writer's purpose (e.g., to persuade or to inform) in a selected passage;

A short explanation and a few short example questions

          evaluate the relevance of each supporting sentence by deleting an irrelevant sentence in a passage;

Interactive paragraphs for irrelevant sentences

          select the most appropriate title for a passage;

How to write titles

          recognize the proper use of the comparative and superlative form of adjectives (CVS);

Great site for explanation and interactive worksheets on comparatives and superlatives

          select the correct word for the sense of the sentence (your and you're, where, and were, it's and its, their, they're, and there, to and too)(CVS);

Common Errors in English Usage

          choose the correct word for the sense of the sentence (stationary and stationery, complement and compliment, principle and principal, accept and except, capitol and capital, affect and effect)(CVS);

Common Errors in English Usage

          determine the stage of the writing process (using graphics which represent the stages: prewriting, first draft, revision, editing, and publishing).

 

A

 

 

A

 

 

A

 

A

 

A

 

 

A

 

A

 

 

A

 

 

 

A

 

A

 

A

 

 

A

 

 

 

A

 

A

 

 

 

 

A

 

 

 

A

 

 

 

 

A

 

A

 

GC

 

 

GC

 

 

C

 

GC

 

O

 

 

C

 

O

 

 

WC

 

 

 

WC

 

O

 

WC

 

 

GC

 

 

 

GC

 

GC

 

 

 

 

M

 

 

 

O

 

 

 

 

O

 

GC

At Level 2, the student is able to

          combine or correct sentence fragments using a subordinate conjunction within a writing sample;

Subordinate conjunctions with examples and exercises

          recognize correct subject/verb agreement with confusing intervening prepositional phrases within a writing sample;

Great explanation, very thorough with self-test

          select sentences to strengthen an argument within either a writing sample or a passage;

Excellent persuasive writing site with examples and lesson activities

          select correct pronoun/antecedent agreement within a writing sample;

Same site as subject/verb agreement link, also with self-test

          select the appropriate transitional word for a given sentence within a paragraph;

Jefferson Countys list of suggested transition words

          distinguish the strongest or weakest point of an argument within a passage;

Excellent PowerPoint on effective writing

          select the most effective method of combining three sentences to improve the structure within a passage;

Interactive site with practice questions and self checking

          select vivid words to strengthen a description (adjective or adverb) within a writing sample or a passage;

Great explanatory handout of word choice

          select vivid words to strengthen a description (verb) within a writing sample or a passage;

Handout activity to practice and use vivid verbs in writing

          determine the most effective order of sentences within a writing sample or a passage;

Good examples and practice questions in a test format

          choose the correct pronoun case in a sentence in which the pronoun follows "than" within a writing sample or a passage;

Very thorough explanation of pronoun case and usage

          recognize a shift in any of the following: verb tense, point of view, tone, or pronoun usage within a writing sample;

Interactive self test from OWL

          recognize the correct use of quotation marks in a direct quote (CVS);

Explanation by OWL, followed by an exercise

          recognize the correct use of a semicolon in a compound sentence within a writing sample or a passage;

OWL again, but a very helpful site with self practice included

 

          choose the thesis that is more effective than the underlined thesis statement (given an introductory paragraph of a student essay);

          rearrange the order of the supporting paragraphs in the specified organizational pattern (e.g., strongest to weakest, time order, cause/effect, or comparison/contrast) within a writing sample;

Excellent lesson of order and transition for supporting paragraphs

          select the best placement for an additional supporting sentence within a writing sample;

Description of qualifying support sentences

          recognize the correct use of the comma to set off nonessential elements in a sentence (CVS).

Good lesson with exercise

 

A

 

 

 

A

 

A

 

C

 

 

 

O

 

O

At Level 3, the student is able to-

          determine which rebuttal statement best refutes the writer's viewpoint or a line that reveals the writer's biases, assumptions, or values within a passage;

Good examples and explanation

          revise sentences using effective parallelism within a writing sample;

Description and self-test

          choose the transitional device that appropriately connects paragraphs (e.g., transitional adverbs, verbal phrases, and unambiguous pronoun references) within a writing sample.

Many examples and uses of transition

 

 

Specifications of Passages:

          early drafts of student essays (one of which must be persuasive);

          consumer report type article written with a persuasive slant of interest to teens (e.g., cars, stereos, or tennis shoes)

          letter to the Editor;

          CVS - A collection of varied sentences containing underlined elements, one of which contains an error, which will be identified by the student; it will be possible for the sentence to contain no error (to be used only where specified by CVS).

Performance Indicators

  As documented through teacher observation -

Teacher:

   

 

 

At Level 1, the student is able to

          describe appropriate details of his/her surroundings;

          relate an incident of controversy using standard English;

          write a letter to the editor and submit it to the school/local newspaper;

          cast a movie for your novel (Who will play the parts and why?);

          use prewriting techniques as a springboard for writing (e.g., clustering, journals, directed response, brainstorming);

          extend the prewriting to draft a composition.

 

 

At Level 2, the student is able to

          create an explanation to a stated problem using standard English;

          write a letter to a major national publication in response to its position/coverage of a subject;

          rewrite a prose passage in dialogue;

          illustrate and caption a comic book version of a short story or a chapter from a novel;

          draft essays using the writing process;

          develop a writing portfolio (e.g., genre, assessment, creativity, and/or voice);

          differentiate between editing and revision.

 

Standard Number:

  2.0 Reading

 

   

Performance Indicators

Reporting As documented through state assessment  -

State:

Category  

 

A

 

A

 

 

A

 

 

 

A

 

M

 

T

 

 

T

 

 

 

T

At Level 1, the student is able to

          discern an implied main idea from a passage (T);

Practice reading and exam

          interpret an author's point of view (1st person or 3rd person limited/omniscient) (T);

          identify the simile, metaphor, onomatopoeia, alliteration, or personification in a given portion of a poem;

Many PowerPoint presentations on figurative language

          identify how the author reveals character (physical characteristics, dialogue, what other characters say about them, and/or character's own actions) (T).

Great handout and explanation

 

A

 

 

A

 

A

 

A

 

A

A

 

A

 

M

 

 

M

 

T

 

M

 

M

M

 

M

At Level 2, the student is able to

          draw inference(s) from a selected passage (T);

Many examples and exercises of inferences

          determine the meaning of a word in context (T);

Many quiz and practice handouts

          differentiate between verbal and situational irony (T);

Great lesson plan with handouts

          pinpoint a cause/effect relationship in a given passage (T);

Cause and Effect Tutorial

          discover the common theme in a series of passages (T);

Good idea and lesson plan on Scholastic

          determine the significance/meaning of a symbol in a written selection (T);

Symbolism lessons and links

          determine the analogous relationship of a vocabulary word from one of the passages.

Great quiz to determine and teach word relationships

 

A

 

T

At Level 3, the student is able to

          select the allusion in a given passage.

Great site with links to handouts, explanations, etc.

Excellent high school pop culture allusion handout

 

 

Specifications of Thematic Passages [indicators followed by (T) will employ these reading selections]

          a thematic presentation of at least three of the following genres:  short story excerpt, poem or dialogue, essay, editorial or magazine article, drama excerpt, and/or news account;

          characterized by a balance of fiction and nonfiction;

          characterized by diversity in structure (prose, poetry, and/or drama);

          characterized by multicultural diversity;

          a short passage leading to further study (optional).

Performance Indicators

  As documented through teacher observation -

Teacher:

   

 

 

At Level 1, the student is able to

          participate in paired readings using one or more sources;

          read silently from a variety of sources;

          identify appropriate resource material for further study of a topic in a nonfiction excerpt (e.g., encyclopedia, almanac, dictionary, and/or thesaurus).

 

 

At Level 2, the student is able to

          participate in a group oral presentation (e.g., choral reading, readers' theater, or play performance);

          present an excerpt from a dramatic work containing dialect and interpret the literal meaning of the passage;

          select appropriate resource material for further study of a topic in a nonfiction excerpt and integrate the resources;

          analyze and create visual and verbal symbols using multiple texts;

          develop a variety of strategies for extending vocabulary (e.g., context, analogy, derivation, etc.).

           

 

At Level 3, the student is able to

          create a story on tape (e.g., sound effects, background music, etc.);

          perform a dramatic presentation/monologue;

          create and present an original project involving the thematic similarity in several genres.

 

Standard Number:

  3.0 Viewing and Representing

 

   

Performance Indicators

Reporting As documented through state assessment  -

State:

Category  

 

A

 

C

At Level 1, the student is able to

          select the type of conflict (man vs. man, man vs. environment, man vs. himself, and man vs. supernatural, et al.) in a photograph.

This seems a bit elementary, but check it out, this has great links and ideas

Good plot and conflict PowerPoint

 

A

 

 

 

 

 

A

 

T

 

 

 

 

 

M

At Level 2, the student is able to

          select the appropriate persuasive device in a given ad (e.g., famous people say, new and improved, everybody's using it, if you want to be popular, et al.);

Great advertisement fallacies lesson plan

Huge file of themed handouts and worksheets to teach persuasion in advertising

          infer the mood or tone in a photograph.

Great interactive link to teach tone, mood, and their differences

 

A

 

T

At Level 3, the student is able to

         prioritize the most reliable media sources given four different sources (e.g., personal journal, interview, authorized biography, People magazine, et al.).

Determining internet site reliability for research

Performance Indicators

  As documented through teacher observation -

Teacher:

   

 

 

 

At Level 1, the student is able to

         develop media applications for a variety of audiences and purposes.

 

               

 

At Level 2, the student is able to

         use media to view, read, write, communicate, and to create;

         distinguish a persuasive device in an advertisement or a portion of a speech (e.g., propaganda, emotional appeal, bandwagon);

         research, organize, interpret, and present information from print and nonprint media;

         analyze the impact of media on daily life;

         analyze the validity and effectiveness of resources.

 

 

At Level 3, the student is able to

          appraise the validity and effectiveness of multiple resources.

 

Standard Number:

  4.0 Speaking and Listening

 

   

Performance Indicators

Reporting As documented through state assessment  -

State:

Category  

 

A

 

T

At Level 1, the student is able to

          determine appropriate preparation for an oral presentation to a specified audience or a special interest group.

Instructional handout for speech preparation

Persuasive speech outline

 

A

 

T

At Level 2, the student is able to

          determine the interest level of an audience through nonverbal communication (e.g., While you are giving a presentation to your classmates, you know that they are interested in what you are saying when . . .).

Nonverbal speech tips and clues

 

A

 

T

At Level 3, the student is able to

          choose the appropriate volume, pitch, rate, diction, inflection, gestures, or body language when delivering a speech (e.g., When delivering a speech, you can best convey your enthusiasm for a topic by . . . ).

Speech giving lesson plan with audio visual aides

Speaking checklist

Performance Indicators

 

As documented through teacher observation -

Teacher:

   

 

 

At Level 1, the student is able to

          give and receive directions accurately and succinctly;

          prepare and give oral presentations to specified audiences.

 

 

At Level 2, the student is able to

          interpret and evaluate the level of audience interest in both the roles of presenter and audience.

 

 

At Level 3, the student is able to

          analyze and select effective delivery techniques in both the roles of presenter and audience.

 

 

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Gateway English

Dynamic Curriculum

PowerPoint Presentations

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Worksheets

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