Social Studies and the World

We Live In

 

Sixth | Seventh | Eighth | Civil War | Ancient History

Secondary Resources

 

A Blueprint for Learning

Social Studies

 

The Blueprint for Learning is a companion document for the Tennessee Curriculum Standards which are located at www.tennessee.gov/education.  Although the curriculum adopted by the State Board of Education in its entirety remains on the web for additional reference, this reformatted version makes the curriculum more accessible to classroom teachers.

 Sixth Grade

Sixth | Seventh | Eighth | Civil War | Ancient History

Secondary Resources

A Blueprint for Learning - Social Studies

 

CULTURE

 Culture encompasses similarities and differences among people, including their beliefs, knowledge, changes, values, and tradition. The student will explore these elements of society to develop an appreciation of and respect for the variety of human cultures.

 


 

Key

Reporting

Category

 

M

 

Define the basic components of culture.

M

 

Identify how communities reflect the cultural background of their inhabitants.

M

 

Compare how cultures differ in their use of similar environments and resources.

M

 

Analyze how human migration and cultural activities influence the character of a place.

M

 

Define religion.

D

 

Describe the beliefs of the world major religions.

D

 

Identify the founders of the world’s major religions.

D

 

Identify characteristics of a physical environment that contribute to the growth and development of a culture.

D

 

Evaluate the effect of technology on a culture.

D

 

Explain why individuals and groups respond differently to their physical and social environments.

D

 

Explain how information and experiences may be interpreted differently from people of diverse cultural perspectives and frames of reference.

D

 

Describe instances in which language, art, music, belief systems, and other cultural elements can facilitate understanding or cause misunderstanding.

D

 

Explain and give examples of how language, literature, the arts, architecture, other artifacts, traditions, beliefs, values, and behaviors contribute to the development and transmission of culture.

M

 

Define cultural diffusion.

M

 

Compare different ways in which cultural diffusion takes place.

M

 

Construct a timeline of technological innovations and rate the importance of technological advancements.

D

 

Show through specific examples how science and technology have changed people’s perceptions of the social and natural world.

D

 

Describe examples in which values, beliefs, and attitudes have been influenced by technological knowledge.

 

ECONOMICS

Globalization of the economy, the explosion of population growth, technological changes and international competition compels the student to understand, both personally and globally, production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services. The student will examine and analyze economic concepts such as basic needs versus wants, using versus saving money, and policy-making versus decision-making.

D

 

Explain the relationship of supply and demand in early world history.

A

E

Recognize an example of a barter economy.

Barter Economy Defined

M

 

Describe the change from hunter/gatherer economies to economies based on animal and plant domestication.

A

E

Identify disadvantages and advantages of nomadic and early farming lifestyles (i.e., shelter, food supply, and, domestication of plants and animals).

M

 

Investigate the impact of trade on the economies of early civilizations.

D

 

Define various types of economies and their methods of production and consumption.

A

E

Recognize the importance of economic systems in the development of early civilizations around rivers (i.e., Tigris and Euphrates, Huang He, Nile, and Indus).

D

 

Apply economic concepts to evaluate historic developments.

D

 

Explain the economic impact of improved communication and transportation.

A

E

Identify major trade routes (i.e., silk roads, Persian trade routes, African trade routes, Mediterranean trade routes, and ocean routes). Silk Road Info  African Trade Route Mediterranean Trade Info Ocean Routes

D

 

Appraise the relationship among scarcity of resources, economic development, and international conflict.

M

 

Differentiate between needs and wants.

D

 

Analyze how supply and demand and change in technologies impact the cost for goods and services.

D

 

Evaluate the relationship between creditors and debtors.

A

E

Recognize the importance of trade in later civilizations (i.e., Mediterranean, Southeast Asia, India, and European).

A

E

Analyze how basic economic ideas influenced world events (i.e., supply and demand lead to exploration and colonization).

 

GEOGRAPHY

Geography enables the students to see, understand and appreciate the web of relationships between people, places, and environments.  The student will use the knowledge, skills, and understanding of concepts within the six essential elements of geography: world in spatial terms, places and regions, physical systems, human systems, environment and society, and the use of geography.

M

 

Use the basic elements of maps and mapping.

A

G

Identify the basic components of a world map (i.e., compass rose, map key, scale, latitude and longitude lines, continents, and oceans).  Components of a Map Latitude & Longitude Continents and Oceans

M

 

Identify the locations of certain physical and human features and events on maps and globes.

A

G

Identify basic geographic forms (i.e., rivers, lakes, bays, oceans, mountains, plateaus, deserts, plains, and coastal plains). Plateau Geographic Landforms  National Geographic Forms Pictures  

M

 

Identify the location of earth’s major landforms such as continents, islands, mountain ranges, and major bodies of water such as the oceans, seas, rivers, and gulfs.

A

G

Use a variety of maps to understand geographic and historical information (i.e., political maps, resource maps, product maps, physical maps, climate maps, and vegetation maps). Physical/Political Map Climate Map Vegetation Map Product Map

M

 

Describe the location of major physical characteristics such as landforms, climate, soils, water, features, vegetation, resources, and animal life; and human characteristics such as language groups, religions, political systems, economic systems, and population centers in the world.

D

 

Explain how and why the location of geographic features both physical and human in the world change over time and space.

A

G

Recognize reasons that cultural groups develop or settle in specific physical environments.

A

G

Identify the location of early civilizations on a map (i.e., Mesopotamian, Egyptian, Ancient Chinese, and Indian).

Ancient Civilizations Map 

D

 

Identify concepts that define and describe spatial organization such as location, distance, direction, scale, movement, and region.

D

 

Explain how changing technology such as transportation and communication technology affect spatial relationships.

D

 

Describe how physical and human processes shape the characteristics of a place.

D

 

Explain how technology shapes the physical and human characteristics of places.

D

 

Explain why places have specific physical and human characteristics in different parts of the world.

A

G

Recognize the basic components of culture (i.e., language, common values, traditions, government, art, literature, and lifestyles).

A

G

Identify geographic reasons for the location of population centers prior to 1500 (i.e., coastal plains, deserts, mountains, and river valleys).


 

 

A

 

G

 

Interpret a graph that illustrates a major trend in world history (i.e., population growth, economic development, governance land areas, and growth of religions). Population Growth   Economic Development   

A

G

Recognize how migration and cultural diffusion influenced the character of world societies (i.e., spread of religions, empire building, exploration, and languages).

 

GOVERNANCE AND CIVICS

Governance establishes structures of power and authority in order to provide order and stability. Civic efficacy requires understanding rights and responsibilities, ethical behavior, and the role of citizens within their community, nation, and world.

D

 

Identify informal and formal forms of governance.

A

GC

Recognize types of government (i.e., formal/informal, monarchy, direct/indirect democracy, republics, and theocracy).

Monarchy   Republics    Theocracy

D

 

Describe the purpose of governance and how its powers are acquired, used, and justified.

D

 

Analyze the necessity of establishing and enforcing the rule of law.

D

 

Originate models of lower to higher forms of social and political orders.

A

GC

Recognize the steps that give rise to complex governmental organizations (i.e., nomadic, farming, village, city, city-states, and states).

M

 

Identify written laws handed down from ancient civilizations.

A

GC

Identify the development of written laws (i.e., Hammurabi’s Code, Justinian Code, and Magna Carta).

Code of Hammurabi   Justinian Code   Magna Carta

D

 

Explore the development of citizenship and government in ancient civilizations.

D

 

Explain and apply concepts such as power, role, status, justice and influence to the examination of persistent issues and social problems.

A

GC

Recognize the roles assigned to individuals in various societies (i.e., caste systems, feudal systems, city-state systems, and class systems). Caste Systems   Feudal Systems and Middle Ages  

D

 

Recognize the relationship between a places’s physical, political, and cultural characteristics and the type of government that emerges in that place.

D

 

Identify natural resources that are necessary to the survival of a civilization.

D

 

Differentiate between rights and privileges of the individual.

A

GC

Compare and contrast the lives of individual citizens in various governmental organizations (i.e., monarchial systems, feudal systems, caste systems, and democratic systems-Greek).

D

 

Consider how cooperation and conflict affects the dissemination of resources, rights, and privileges.

 

HISTORY

History involves people, events, and issues. The student will evaluate evidence to develop comparative and causal analyses, and to interpret primary sources. He/she will construct sound historical arguments and perspectives on which informed decisions in contemporary life can be based.

* Some state performance indicators are listed in more than one era. These may be assessed in any of the eras in which they appear, but not necessarily in all eras in which they appear.

World History Standards Era 1: The Beginnings of Human Society

M

 

List ancient weapons and tools.

M

 

Understand the role of the environment in terms of influencing the development of weapons and tools.

M

 

Explain the role of agriculture in early settled communities.

M

 

Recognize the immediate and long term impacts and influences of early agricultural communities such as Southwest Asia and the African Nile Valley.

M

 

Describe the biological processes that shaped the earliest human communities.

M

 

Identify the characteristics of hunter-gatherer communities in various continental regions in Africa versus the Americas.

M

 

Explain how different early human communities expressed their beliefs.

M

 

Explain how geologists, archaeologists, and anthropologists study early human development.

M

 

Identify scientific evidence regarding early human settlements in Africa.

*A

WH 1

Recognize the types of early communities (i.e., nomadic, fishing, and farming).

Nomad Pics  

*A

WH 1

Identify major technological advances (i.e., tools, wheel, irrigation, river dikes, development of farming, advances in weaponry, written language, and printing press).

*A

WH 1

Recognize the world's major religions and their founders (i.e., Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, Moses, Jesus, and Mohammed).   Judiasm   

*A

WH 1

Identify how early writing forms in Mesopotamia, Egypt, and the Indus Valley influenced life (i.e., legal, religious, and culture).

*A

WH 1

Recognize the significant mythologies of the Sumerians, Egyptians, Greeks, and Romans.

*A

WH 1, 2

Recognize the designations for time dating (i.e., BCE, AD, centuries, decades, prehistoric, and historic).

*A

WH 1, 2

Recognize major historical time periods (i.e., Early Civilizations, Classical Period, Dark Ages, Middle Ages, and Renaissance).

*A

WH 1, 2

Read a timeline and order events of the past between prehistory and the Renaissance.

*A

WH 1, 2

Identify examples of groups impacting world history (i.e., Muslims, Christians, Mongolians, Vikings, slave traders, explorers, merchants/traders, and inventors.)

*A

WH 1, 2

Identify characteristics including economy, social relations, religion, and political authority of various societies (i.e., Mesopotamian, Egyptian, Greek City-States, Roman Empire, Indian, and Medieval).

*A

WH 1, 2

Describe the ways in which individuals can change groups (i.e., Martin Luther – Christian church, William of Normandy – English Monarchy, Joan of Arc – Hundred Years War, and Buddha – Chinese Culture).

*A

WH 1, 2

Recognize the possible causes of change in civilizations (i.e., environmental change, political collapse, new ideas, warfare, overpopulation, unreliable food sources, and diseases).

*A

WH 1, 2

Recognize the impact of individuals on world history (i.e., Charlemagne, Joan of Arc, William the Conqueror, Ramses II, Julius Caesar, Socrates, Aristotle, Marco Polo, Alexander the Great, King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella, Martin Luther, and Johannes Gutenberg).

*A

WH 1, 2

Identify the job characteristics of archaeologists, anthropologists, geologists, and historians.

Archaeologists   Anthropologists     Geologists

*A

WH 1, 2

Identify differences between various cultural groups (i.e., European, Eurasian, Indian, Southeast Asian, Middle Eastern, African, and Native American).

*A

WH 1, 2

Identify types of artifacts by pictorial representation (i.e., Egyptian, Roman, Greek, Chinese, Native American, Medieval, and Renaissance).

*A

WH 1, 2

Identify major technological advances (i.e., tools, wheel, irrigation, river dikes, development of farming, advances in weaponry, written language, and printing press).

*A

WH 1, 2

Identify conclusions about early world historical events using primary and secondary sources.

*A

WH 1, 2

Identify the development of written and spoken languages (i.e., Roman alphabet, Latin word origins, Romance Languages).

 

World History Standards Era 2: Early Civilizations and the Emergence of Pastoral Peoples (4000-1000 BCE)

M

 

Describe the characteristics of writing in Mesopotamia, Egypt, and the Indus valley and how their written records shaped political, legal, religious, and cultural life.

M

 

Compare and contrast the Mycenaean Greek development of agriculture, writing, education, law, and trade with another society.

M

 

Explain how the development of different types of tools, laws, and religion influenced early Chinese civilization.

M

 

Compare and contrast how the economic, political, cultural, and environmental factors among the ancient civilizations of Egypt, Indus River Valley, China, and Mesopotamia shaped their histories.

M

 

Explain the decline of the Indus Valley civilization.

M

 

Identify significant individuals and events in Egyptian civilization.

M

 

Describe the characteristics of Aryan society.

M

 

Describe what archaeological evidence reveals about Chinese history during the Chang Dynasty.

M

 

Identify early forms of writing, law, and trade (i.e., cuneiform, hieroglyphics, barter, Code of Hammurabi, and the Ten Commandments).

cuneiform hieroglyphics Native American

*A

WH 1

Recognize the types of early communities (i.e., nomadic, fishing, and farming).

*A

WH 1

Identify major technological advances (i.e., tools, wheel, irrigation, river dikes, development of farming, advances in weaponry, written language, and printing press).

*A

WH 1

Recognize the world's major religions and their founders (i.e., Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, Moses, Jesus, and Mohammed).

*A

WH 1

Recognize significant epics as historical sources (i.e., Iliad, the Odyssey, Mahabharata, and Ramayana).

*A

WH 1

Identify how early writing forms in Mesopotamia, Egypt, and the Indus Valley influenced life (i.e., legal, religious, and culture).

*A

WH 1

Recognize the significant mythologies of the Sumerians, Egyptians, Greeks, and Romans.

*A

WH 1, 2

Recognize the designations for time dating (i.e., BCE, AD, centuries, decades, prehistoric, and historic).

*A

WH 1, 2

Recognize major historical time periods (i.e., Early Civilizations, Classical Period, Dark Ages, Middle Ages, and Renaissance).

*A

WH 1, 2

Read a timeline and order events of the past between prehistory and the Renaissance.

*A

WH 1, 2

Identify examples of groups impacting world history (i.e., Muslims, Christians, Mongolians, Vikings, slave traders, explorers, merchants/traders, and inventors.)

*A

WH 1, 2

Identify characteristics including economy, social relations, religion, and political authority of various societies (i.e., Mesopotamian, Egyptian, Greek City-States, Roman Empire, Indian, and Medieval).

*A

WH 1, 2

Describe the ways in which individuals can change groups (i.e., Martin Luther – Christian church, William of Normandy – English Monarchy, Joan of Arc – Hundred Years War, and Buddha – Chinese Culture).

*A

WH 1, 2

Recognize the possible causes of change in civilizations (i.e., environmental change, political collapse, new ideas, warfare, overpopulation, unreliable food sources, and diseases).

*A

WH 1, 2

Recognize the impact of individuals on world history (i.e., Charlemagne, Joan of Arc, William the Conqueror, Ramses II, Julius Caesar, Socrates, Aristotle, Marco Polo, Alexander the Great, King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella, Martin Luther, and Johannes Gutenberg).

*A

WH 1, 2

Identify the job characteristics of archaeologists, anthropologists, geologists, and historians.

*A

WH 1, 2

Identify differences between various cultural groups (i.e., European, Eurasian, Indian, Southeast Asian, Middle Eastern, African, and Native American).

*A

WH 1, 2

Identify types of artifacts by pictorial representation (i.e., Egyptian, Roman, Greek, Chinese, Native American, Medieval, and Renaissance).    Egyptian Artifacts   Ancient China Notes/Pics  

*A

WH 1, 2

Identify major technological advances (i.e., tools, wheel, irrigation, river dikes, development of farming, advances in weaponry, written language, and printing press).

*A

WH 1, 2

Identify conclusions about early world historical events using primary and secondary sources.

*A

WH 1, 2

Identify the development of written and spoken languages (i.e., Roman alphabet, Latin word origins, Romance Languages).

 

World History Standards Era 3: Classical Traditions, Major Religions, and Giant Empires (1000 BCE-300 AD)

M

 

Illustrate the placement of major religions on the earth’s surface.

M

 

Compare and contrast elements of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.

M

 

Identify the causes and spread of Christianity.

M

 

Explain the origins of Buddhism and fundamental Buddhist beliefs.

M

 

Explain the patterns of Phoenician political organization, culture, and trade in the Mediterranean basin.

M

 

Describe the development of Greek city-states and their political and social characteristics.

M

 

Identify the characteristics of the Assyrian and Babylonian Empires.

M

 

Explain the impact and achievements of the Hellenistic period on art, mathematics, science, philosophy, and political thought.

M

 

Understand the origins and social framework of Roman society.

M

 

Identify fundamental social, political, and cultural characteristics of Chinese society under early imperial dynasties.

M

 

Compare geographical and architectural features of Egypt.

M

 

Identify major cultural elements of Greek society such as sculpture, architecture, and pottery.

M

 

Explore the role of art, literature, and mythology in Greek society by analyzing primary sources.

M

 

Explain the political, commercial, and cultural uses of Latin and Greek as universal languages of the Roman Empire.

M

 

Construct timelines to show sequences of important dates and events.

M

 

Identify cause and effect of events leading to the rise and decline of civilizations.

M

 

Describe how the rise and decline of military power, state bureaucracy, legal codes, belief systems, written languages, and communications and trade networks affected societies.

*A

WH 1

Recognize the types of early communities (i.e., nomadic, fishing, and farming).

*A

WH 1

Identify major technological advances (i.e., tools, wheel, irrigation, river dikes, development of farming, advances in weaponry, written language, and printing press).

*A

WH 1

Recognize the world's major religions and their founders (i.e., Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, Moses, Jesus, and Mohammed).

*A

WH 1

Recognize significant epics as historical sources (i.e., Iliad, the Odyssey, Mahabharata, and Ramayana).

*A

WH 1

Identify how early writing forms in Mesopotamia, Egypt, and the Indus Valley influenced life (i.e., legal, religious, and culture).

*A

WH 1

Recognize the significant mythologies of the Sumerians, Egyptians, Greeks, and Romans.

*A

WH 1, 2

Recognize the designations for time dating (i.e., BCE, AD, centuries, decades, prehistoric, and historic).

*A

WH 1, 2

Recognize major historical time periods (i.e., Early Civilizations, Classical Period, Dark Ages, Middle Ages, and Renaissance).

*A

WH 1, 2

Read a timeline and order events of the past between prehistory and the Renaissance.

*A

WH 1, 2

Identify examples of groups impacting world history (i.e., Muslims, Christians, Mongolians, Vikings, slave traders, explorers, merchants/traders, and inventors.)

*A

WH 1, 2

Identify characteristics including economy, social relations, religion, and political authority of various societies (i.e., Mesopotamian, Egyptian, Greek City-States, Roman Empire, Indian, and Medieval).

*A

WH 1, 2

Describe the ways in which individuals can change groups (i.e., Martin Luther – Christian church, William of Normandy – English Monarchy, Joan of Arc – Hundred Years War, and Buddha – Chinese Culture).

*A

WH 1, 2

Recognize the possible causes of change in civilizations (i.e., environmental change, political collapse, new ideas, warfare, overpopulation, unreliable food sources, and diseases).

*A

WH 1, 2

Recognize the impact of individuals on world history (i.e., Charlemagne, Joan of Arc, William the Conqueror, Ramses II, Julius Caesar, Socrates, Aristotle, Marco Polo, Alexander the Great, King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella, Martin Luther, and Johannes Gutenberg).

*A

WH 1, 2

Identify the job characteristics of archaeologists, anthropologists, geologists, and historians.

*A

WH 1, 2

Identify differences between various cultural groups (i.e., European, Eurasian, Indian, Southeast Asian, Middle Eastern, African, and Native American).

*A

WH 1, 2

Identify types of artifacts by pictorial representation (i.e., Egyptian, Roman, Greek, Chinese, Native American, Medieval, and Renaissance). Roman Pictures   Greek Pictures/Notes   

*A

WH 1, 2

Identify major technological advances (i.e., tools, wheel, irrigation, river dikes, development of farming, advances in weaponry, written language, and printing press).

*A

WH 1, 2

Identify conclusions about early world historical events using primary and secondary sources.

*A

WH 1, 2

Identify the development of written and spoken languages (i.e., Roman alphabet, Latin word origins, Romance Languages).

 

World History Standards Era 4: Expanding Zones of Exchange and Encounter (300AD-1000 AD)

M

 

Identify the spread of Christian belief in Europe.

M

 

Diagram the social structure of medieval society.

M

 

Explain the significance of Norse migrations and invasions.

M

 

Describe social class and gender roles in Medieval Europe.

M

 

Understand the significant features of Mayan and Andean civilization as in their location of cities, road systems, sea routes, status of elite women and men, art, and architecture.

M

 

Recognize the importance of maritime and overland trade routes linking regions of Afro-Eurasian societies.

M

 

List the major achievements in technology, astronomy, and medicine in the Gupta societies.

M

 

Identify monastic examples of preserving Greco-Roman and early Christian learning.

M

 

Read an example of African oral history for its historical importance.

M

 

Identify the spread of Islamic belief in Asia and Africa.

M

 

Explain how the influence of Islamic ideas and practices influenced culture and social behavior.

M

 

Describe the characteristics of and development of great African and Asian civilizations.

M

 

Identify the impact of Chinese society on surrounding cultures in terms of assimilation of ideas and political autonomy.

*A

WH 2

Recognize and order major historical events on a timeline between the Middle Ages and Renaissance.   

*A

WH 2

Identify the impact of advances in technology on history (i.e., agricultural revolution, Renaissance scientists, exploration during the 1400s).

*A

WH 2

Recognize how the Renaissance changes the nature of society (i.e., shift from religious domination to science, philosophy, and art).

*A

WH 2

Evaluate to what extent civilizations build on the accomplishments of previous civilizations.

*A

WH 2

Compare and contrast the historical development of the Western, Eastern, and African cultures.

*A

WH 1, 2

Recognize the designations for time dating (i.e., BCE, AD, centuries, decades, prehistoric, and historic).

*A

WH 1, 2

Recognize major historical time periods (i.e., Early Civilizations, Classical Period, Dark Ages, Middle Ages, and Renaissance).

*A

WH 1, 2

Read a timeline and order events of the past between prehistory and the Renaissance.

*A

WH 1, 2

Identify examples of groups impacting world history (i.e., Muslims, Christians, Mongolians, Vikings, slave traders, explorers, merchants/traders, and inventors.)

*A

WH 1, 2

Identify characteristics including economy, social relations, religion, and political authority of various societies (i.e., Mesopotamian, Egyptian, Greek City-States, Roman Empire, Indian, and Medieval).

*A

WH 1, 2

Describe the ways in which individuals can change groups (i.e., Martin Luther – Christian church, William of Normandy – English Monarchy, Joan of Arc – Hundred Years War, and Buddha – Chinese Culture).

*A

WH 1, 2

Recognize the possible causes of change in civilizations (i.e., environmental change, political collapse, new ideas, warfare, overpopulation, unreliable food sources, and diseases).

*A

WH 1, 2

Recognize the impact of individuals on world history (i.e., Charlemagne, Joan of Arc, William the Conqueror, Ramses II, Julius Caesar, Socrates, Aristotle, Marco Polo, Alexander the Great, King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella, Martin Luther, and Johannes Gutenberg).

*A

WH 1, 2

Identify the job characteristics of archaeologists, anthropologists, geologists, and historians.

*A

WH 1, 2

Identify differences between various cultural groups (i.e., European, Eurasian, Indian, Southeast Asian, Middle Eastern, African, and Native American).

*A

WH 1, 2

Identify types of artifacts by pictorial representation (i.e., Egyptian, Roman, Greek, Chinese, Native American, Medieval, and Renaissance).

*A

WH 1, 2

Identify major technological advances (i.e., tools, wheel, irrigation, river dikes, development of farming, advances in weaponry, written language, and printing press).

*A

WH 1, 2

Identify conclusions about early world historical events using primary and secondary sources.

*A

WH 1, 2

Identify the development of written and spoken languages (i.e., Roman alphabet, Latin word origins, Romance Languages).

 

World History Standards Era 5: The Emergence of Europe (1200-1500AD)

I

 

Recognize the developments of science, philosophy, and art in the 14th and 15th centuries.

I

 

Understand the significant developments of medieval English in legal and constitutional practices and how this shaped the development of European governments.

I

 

Recognize the origins and the economic, social, and political impact of the plague upon Eurasian societies.

I

 

Judge the significance of the Reformation on the development of Europe.

I

 

Compare and contrast feudalism and manoralism.

I

 

Explain the cultural characteristics of Islamic society such as a common language, religious text, and society and how this led to cohesiveness across regions.

I

 

Identify features of trade routes in Asia, Europe, and Africa.

I

 

Describe the roles and motivations of squires, saints, and soldiers in Christian Europe.

I

 

Describe the economic, social, and religious features of West Africa.

I

 

Identify aspects of the architecture of Medieval Europe and how some elements may still be seen in local and modern architecture.

I

 

Compare and contrast art, architecture, and education in medieval Christian and Spanish Muslim society.

I

 

Rate the importance of foreign sources in recording the history in areas of Mongol domination as in the travels of Marco Polo and ibn Battuta.

*A

WH1,2

Recognize the designations for time dating (i.e., BCE, AD, centuries, decades, prehistoric, and historic).

*A

WH1,2

Recognize major historical time periods (i.e., Early Civilizations, Classical Period, Dark Ages, Middle Ages, and Renaissance).

*A

WH1,2

Read a timeline and order events of the past between prehistory and the Renaissance.

*A

WH1,2

Identify examples of groups impacting world history (i.e., Muslims, Christians, Mongolians, Vikings, slave traders, explorers, merchants/traders, and inventors.)

*A

WH1,2

Identify characteristics including economy, social relations, religion, and political authority of various societies (i.e., Mesopotamian, Egyptian, Greek City-States, Roman Empire, Indian, and Medieval).

*A

WH1,2

Describe the ways in which individuals can change groups (i.e., Martin Luther – Christian church, William of Normandy – English Monarchy, Joan of Arc – Hundred Years War, and Buddha – Chinese Culture).

*A

WH1,2

Recognize the possible causes of change in civilizations (i.e., environmental change, political collapse, new ideas, warfare, overpopulation, unreliable food sources, and diseases).

*A

WH1,2

Recognize the impact of individuals on world history (i.e., Charlemagne, Joan of Arc, William the Conqueror, Ramses II, Julius Caesar, Socrates, Aristotle, Marco Polo, Alexander the Great, King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella, Martin Luther, and Johannes Gutenberg).

 Martin Luther  William the Conqueror  Joan of Arc  Alexander the Great

Aristotle   Socrates  Gutenberg  Charlemagne  Julius Caesar  Ferdinand  Isabella

*A

WH1,2

Identify the job characteristics of archaeologists, anthropologists, geologists, and historians.

*A

WH1,2

Identify differences between various cultural groups (i.e., European, Eurasian, Indian, Southeast Asian, Middle Eastern, African, and Native American).

*A

WH1,2

Identify types of artifacts by pictorial representation (i.e., Egyptian, Roman, Greek, Chinese, Native American, Medieval, and Renaissance).  Renaissance

*A

WH1,2

Identify major technological advances (i.e., tools, wheel, irrigation, river dikes, development of farming, advances in weaponry, written language, and printing press).

*A

WH1,2

Identify conclusions about early world historical events using primary and secondary sources.

*A

WH1,2

Identify the development of written and spoken languages (i.e., Roman alphabet, Latin word origins, Romance Languages).

*A

WH2

Recognize and order major historical events on a timeline between the Middle Ages and Renaissance.   

*A

WH2

Identify the impact of advances in technology on history (i.e., agricultural revolution, Renaissance scientists, exploration during the 1400s).

Agricultural Revolution

*A

WH2

Recognize how the Renaissance changes the nature of society (i.e., shift from religious domination to science, philosophy, and art).

Renaissance

*A

WH2

Evaluate to what extent civilizations build on the accomplishments of previous civilizations.

*A

WH2

Compare and contrast the historical development of the Western, Eastern, and African cultures.

 

INDIVIDUALS, GROUPS, AND INTERACTIONS

Personal development and identity are shaped by factors including culture, groups, and institutions. Central to this development are exploration, identification, and analysis of how individuals and groups work independently and cooperatively.

M

 

Recognize that individuals can belong to groups but still have their own identity.

I

 

Relate personal changes to social, cultural, and historical contexts.

I

 

Describe personal connections to place, as associated with community, nation, and world.

I

 

Describe ways regional, ethnic, and national cultures influence individuals’ daily lives.

I

 

Identify and describe ways family, groups, and community influence the individual’s daily life and personal choices.

I

 

Demonstrate an understanding of concepts such as role, status, and social class in describing the interactions of individuals and social groups.

I

 

Analyze group and institutional influences on people, events, and elements of culture.

 

SOCIAL STUDIES PROCESS STANDARDS

The student will use social studies process standards to acquire information, analyze, problem solve, communicate, and develop a historical awareness.

D

 

Detect cause and effect relationships to acquire information.

D

 

Distinguish between fact and opinion to recognize propaganda to acquire information.

D

 

Use maps, graphs, globes, media, and technology sources to acquire information.

D

 

Discover resources available from museums, historical sites, presidential libraries, and local and state preservation societies to acquire information.

D

 

Identify relevant factual material to problem solve and analyze data.

D

 

Classify information by source, chronology, and importance to problem solve and analyze data.

D

 

Critically examine data from a variety of sources to problem solve and analyze data.

D

 

Detect bias in data presented in a variety of forms to problem solve and analyze data.

D

 

Note cause/effect relationship and draw inferences from a variety of data to problem solve and analyze data.

D

 

Read critically a variety of materials including textbooks, historical documents, newspapers, magazines, and other reference sources for historical awareness.

D

 

Construct and analyze timelines for historical awareness.

D

 

Utilize community resources such as field trips, guest speakers, and museums for historical awareness.

D

 

Incorporate the use of technological resources for historical awareness.

D

 

Utilize primary and secondary source material such as biographies and autobiographies; novels; speeches and letters; and poetry, songs, and artwork for historical awareness.

top

 

Seventh Grade

Sixth | Seventh | Eighth | Civil War | Ancient History

Secondary Resources

A Blueprint for Learning - Social Studies

 

CULTURE

 

Culture encompasses similarities and differences among people, including their beliefs, knowledge, changes, values, and tradition.  The student will explore these elements of society to develop an appreciation of and respect for the variety of human cultures.

 


 

Key

Reporting

Category

 

M

 

Define the basic components of culture.

 

M

 

Explain how people living in the same region maintain different ways of life.

M

 

Identify how communities locally, regionally, and globally reflect the cultural background of their inhabitants.

D

 

Analyze the role of cultural diffusion and interactions among Earth’s human systems in the ongoing development of Earth’s cultural landscapes.

D

 

Identify and describe the location of major cultural attributes such as language, religion, political systems, economic systems, and population centers locally, regionally, and globally.

M

 

Define religion.

D

 

Describe the beliefs of the world’s major religions.

D

 

Evaluate the role of religious beliefs on local, regional, nation-state, and global levels.

I

 

Identify characteristics of a physical environment that contribute to the growth and development of a culture.

M

 

Compare how cultures differ in their use of similar environments and resources.

D

 

Evaluate the effect of technology on various cultures.

D

 

Explain how information and experiences may be interpreted differently from people of diverse cultural perspectives and frames of reference.

D

 

Describe how language, art, music, belief systems, and other cultural elements facilitate global understanding or cause misunderstanding.

 

ECONOMICS

Globalization of the economy, the explosion of population growth, technological changes and international competition compels the student to understand, both personally and globally, production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services. The student will examine and analyze economic concepts such as basic needs versus wants, using versus saving money, and policy-making versus decision-making.

I

 

Define various types of economies and their methods of production and consumption (e.g., market economy, free enterprise, capitalism, communism, and socialism).

D

 

List the major resources and industrial and agricultural products, locally, regionally, and globally.

A

E

Define renewable and nonrenewable resources.

Natural resources: Can we use them forever

D

 

Apply basic economic concepts in studying the various regions of the world such as export, import, tariffs, and closed and emerging markets.

A

E

Recognize basic economic concepts (i.e., imports, exports, barter system, tariffs, closed and emerging markets, supply and demand, inflation, recession, and depression).

Money Lessons:  Supply and Demand and Other Lessons

 

D

 

Explain the interactions between domestic and global economic systems.

D

 

Recognize that resources, goods, and services are exchanged worldwide.

A

E

Select the major resources, industrial, and agricultural products from the three grand divisions from a map of Tennessee.

TN State Information

D

 

Explain the economic impact of improved communication and transportation.

D

 

Appraise the relationship among scarcity of resources, economic development, and international conflict.

I

 

Evaluate the domestic and international impact of various economic agreements.

I

 

Apply economic concepts to evaluate contemporary developments.

A

E

Interpret economic issues as expressed with maps, tables, diagrams, and charts.

Reading Graphs and Charts

M

 

Describe the characteristics, location, and use of renewable and nonrenewable resources.

M

 

Identify ways resources are recycled.

D

 

Describe patterns of resource distribution and utilization.

Types and Numbers of Professions 1800

D

 

Discover the relationship between the use, availability, and accessibility of resources and a country’s standard of living, including the role of technology in resource acquisition and use.

D

 

Analyze issues related to the location, availability, use, distribution, and trade of natural resources.

Economic Markets

 

GEOGRAPHY

Geography enables the student to see, understand and appreciate the web of relationships between people, places, and environments. The student will use the knowledge, skills, and understanding of concepts within the six essential elements of geography: world in spatial terms, places and regions, physical systems, human systems, environment and society, and the use of geography.

M

 

Identify, describe, and be able to use the basic elements of maps and mapping.

A

PG

Identify and use the basic elements of maps and mapping.

Tutorial on Map Reading

Mapping PPT

Mapping PPT II

Scale and Distance Readings PPT

M

 

Identify the location of physical and human attributes on maps and globes at local, regional, and global scales.

A

PG

Locate on map specific lines of longitude and latitude. (i.e.,  Prime Meridian, International Date Line, Equator, North and South Poles,  Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn, and Arctic Antarctic Circles).

Reading Latitude and Longitude PPT  

Latitude and Longitude mapping Quiz

Great PPT Lesson

A

PG

Locate the earth's major physical characteristics (i.e., 7 continents and 4 oceans).

Continents and Oceans PPT Lesson    

A

HG

Distinguish between types of maps. (i.e., political, physical, climatic, land-use resource, contour, elevation, and topographic.)

Great Map PPT Lesson

Description of Each Map Type: PPT Lesson

M

 

Demonstrate an understanding of various types of maps including thematic and topographic maps.

A

PG

Interpret a map indicating scale, distance, and direction.

Scale and Distance PPT

Direction PPT

A

PG

Read and interpret a time zone map.

Time Zone Lesson PPT

Time Zones of the USA

M

 

Discuss applications of current geographic techniques in mapping such as GIS and GPS.

M

 

Identify the location of the earth’s major physical characteristics such as continents, landforms, bodies of water, climate regions, vegetation, and natural resources.

A

PG

Identify the major river systems of Tennessee.

Map of Major TN Rivers

A

PG

Select the natural resources found in the 3 grand divisions of Tennessee (coal, copper, timber, plants, and animals.)

Map of Three Grand Divisions

A

PG

Identify the location of the earth's major landforms and bodies of water (i.e., Rockies, Andes, Himalayas, Alps, Urals, Sahara desert, Nile River Valley, Great Plains, Mississippi River, Amazon River, Thames River, Seine River, Rhine River, Danube River, Tigris River, Eurphrates River, Ganges River, Volga River, and Yellow River).

World Physical Maps by Continent

A

PG

Identify the six physical regions of Tennessee (i.e., Unaka Mountains, Valley and Ridge, Cumberland Plateau, Highland Rim, Central Basin, and Gulf Coastal Plain).

 

M

 

Identify the location and size of major human features such as cities, political units, and countries.

A

HG

Distinguish the differences among rural, suburban, and urban communities.

M

 

Explain why physical, biological, and human processes leave discernable patterns on the earth’s surface locally, regionally, and globally.

M

 

Identify the spatial distribution of major ecosystems such as tropical rainforest, desert, and grassland.

A

PG

Identify the characteristics that define a region geographically.

M

 

Identify concepts and geographic tools used to define and describe spatial organization such as absolute and relative location, distance, direction, scale, movement, and region.

M

 

Explain patterns of spatial organization including why some areas are more densely settled than others and the differences between rural, urban, and suburban patterns.

A

HG

Define demographic concepts. (i.e., population, population distribution, population density, and growth rate).

A

PG

Compare the five largest cities of Tennessee using a bar graph.

M

 

Describe factors that affect spatial organization of the earth’s surface such as transportation, migration, and communication technology.

M

 

Identify which features on the earth’s surface are physical and which are human.

A

PG

Recognize specific physical processes that operate on the earth’s surface (i.e., erosion, volcanoes, earthquakes, wind and water currents, plate tectonics, and weathering).

M

 

Describe how physical, biological, and human characteristics and processes define and shape a place.

M

 

Describe how human movement and migration influence the character of a place.

M

 

Appraise the symbiotic relationship between the physical and human environments as they are reflected on the earth’s surface.

M

 

Identify the criteria used to define a region, including physical traits and formal, functional, and vernacular cultural regions.

M

 

Describe types of regions at the local, regional, and global level.

M

 

Describe how cultures influence the characteristics of regions and how human characteristics make specific regions of the world distinctive.

M

 

Explain factors that contribute to changing regional characteristics and boundaries.

M

 

Identify types of the earth’s physical processes such as tectonic activity, and changing landforms.

M

 

Consider the effect of weathering and erosion, the hydrologic cycle and climate change.

M

 

Analyze physical patterns and ecosystems found locally, regionally, and globally.

M

 

Examine the consequences of a specific physical process operating on the earth’s surface.

M

 

Describe how the characteristics of different physical environments affect human activities including ways in which people adapt to living in different physical environments.

M

 

Describe the impact and interaction of natural hazards and disasters on human settlements and systems.

M

 

Evaluate the limits and opportunities of physical environments for human activities.

M

 

Describe effects of human modification on the physical environment including global warming, deforestation, desertification, and urbanization.

M

 

Explain the ways in which human induced changes in the physical environment in one place can cause changes in other places.

M

 

Analyze the environmental consequences of humans changing the physical environment.

A

HG

Recognize the definitions of modifications on the physical environment (i.e., global warming, deforestation, desert, and urbanization).

A

HG

Analyze the environmental consequences of humans changing their physical environment (i.e., air and water pollution, mining, deforestation, and global warming).

M

 

Identify the characteristics of populations at a variety of scales including ethnicity, age distribution, number of males and females, and life expectancy.

A

HG

Interpret a population pyramid.

M

 

Define demographic concepts including population, population distribution, population density, growth rate, family size, and infant mortality.

A

HG

Define demographic concepts (i.e., population, population distribution, population density, growth rate, family size, and infant mortality).

A

HG

Recognize cultural definitions (i.e., language, religion, customs, political system, and economic system.

A

HG

Locate cultural information on a thematic map (i.e., languages, political systems, economic systems, and religions).

M

 

Describe the causes and effects of human migration such as "push and pull" factors.

M

 

Analyze contemporary population issues.

A

HG

Predict the consequences of population changes on the Earth’s physical and cultural environments (I.e., air and water pollution, mining, deforestation, and global).

A

HG

View and discuss a show which shows a diverse global culture.  

 

GOVERNANCE AND CIVICS

Governance establishes structures of power and authority in order to provide order and stability. Civic efficacy requires understanding rights and responsibilities, ethical behavior, and the role of citizens within their community, nation, and world.

M

 

Recognize world political regions locally, regionally, and globally.

A

GC

Using a map key, locate various governance systems.

A

GC

Identify political leaders from selected contemporary settings (i.e., United States, India, Canada, Mexico, Great Britain, Russia, and China).

M

 

Explain the purposes and structure of various systems of governance.

A

GC

Define the different types of governments (i.e., democracy, autocracy, oligarchy, monarchy, and dictatorship).

M

 

Compare different political systems with that of the United States and identify political leaders from selected contemporary settings.

A

GC

 Recognize how the boundaries of congressional districts change in the state of Tennessee (i.e., statutory requirements, population shifts, and political power shifts).

A

GC

Differentiate between the rights, roles, and state of the individual in relation to the general welfare in various regions of the world.

M

 

Explain the relationship between a place’s physical, political, and cultural characteristics and the type of government that arises in that place.

D

 

Identify international and multinational organizations of cooperation.

D

 

Describe the current struggles over energy resources and how different governments resolve these problems.

D

 

Describe conditions and motivations that contribute to conflict, cooperation, and interdependence among groups, societies, and nations.

A

 GC

Recognize the causes, consequences, and possible solutions applied by governing bodies to persistent global issue using a narrative (i.e., health, security, resource allocation, economic development, and environmental quality).

D

 

Explore governmental responses to environmental issues such as air pollution, watershed management, water pollution and solid waste, including hazardous and toxic waste.

D

 

Describe ideas and mechanisms governments develop to meet needs and wants of citizens, regulate territory, manage conflict, and establish order and security.


 

HISTORY

History involves people, events, and issues.  The student will evaluate evidence to develop comparative and causal analyses, and to interpret primary sources. He/she will construct sound historical arguments and perspectives on which informed decisions in contemporary life can be based.

D

 

Identify reasons why people choose to settle in different places.

A

H

Identify the causes and consequences of urbanization (i.e., industrial development, education, health care, cultural opportunities, poverty, overcrowding, disease, pollution, and crime).

D

 

Explain how and why the location of settlements changes over space and time locally, regionally, and globally.

A

H

Identify reasons why people choose to settle in different places (i.e., occupation, family, climate, and natural resources).

D

 

Explain factors leading to areas of dense human settlement.

A

H

Map large civilizations to discover the impact of water as a main reason behind a society's founding.

D

 

Describe factors involved in the growth and development of cities.

D

 

Evaluate the causes and consequences of urbanization.

D

 

Identify the physical and human factors that influence a place.

A

H

Identify ways family, groups, and community influence daily life and personal choices.

D

 

Analyze the causes and effects of changes in a place over time.

A

H

Analyze, from a written passage, the causes and effects of change in a place over time.

A

H

Compare and contrast the tenets of the five major world religions (i.e., Christianity, Buddhism, Islam, Hinduism, and Judaism).

A

H

Examine reasons and patterns of human migration through the use of maps, charts, and diagrams (i.e., famine, natural disasters, political and religious oppression, and wars).

 

INDIVIDUALS, GROUPS, AND INTERACTIONS

Personal development and identity are shaped by factors including culture, groups, and institutions. Central to this development are exploration, identification, and analysis of how individuals and groups work independently and cooperatively.

M

 

Recognize that individuals can belong to groups but still retain their own identity.

M

 

Know how to share and give opinions in a group.

M

 

Describe personal connections to a place.

D

 

Identify and describe ways regional, ethnic, and national cultures influence individuals’ daily lives.

D

 

Examine issues involving the rights, roles, and status of the individual in relation to the general welfare in various regions of the world.

D

 

Identify ways family, groups, and community influence daily life and personal choices.

D

 

Demonstrate an understanding of concepts such as role, status, and social class when describing the interactions of individuals and social groups in various regions of the world.

D

 

Explore the causes, consequences, and possible solutions applied by governing bodies to persistent global issues such as health, security, resource allocation, economic development, and environmental quality.

D

 

Identify the effects of physical and human geographic factors on current policies and issues such as land use, urban planning, and conservation issues.

D

 

Describe the impact of contemporary patterns of consumption, production, and population growth on the future spatial organization of the earth.

D

 

Integrate multiple points of view to analyze and evaluate contemporary geographic issues.

 

SOCIAL STUDIES PROCESS STANDARDS

The student will use social studies process standards to acquire information, analyze, problem solve, communicate, and develop a historical awareness.

D

 

Detect cause and effect relationships to acquire information.

D

 

Distinguish between fact and opinion to recognize propaganda to acquire information.

D

 

Use maps, graphs, globes, media, and technology sources to acquire information.

D

 

Discover resources available from museums, historical sites, presidential libraries, and local and state preservation societies to acquire information.

D

 

Identify relevant factual material to problem solve and analyze data.

D

 

Classify information by source, chronology, and importance to problem solve and analyze data.

D

 

Critically examine data from a variety of sources to problem solve and analyze data.

D

 

Detect bias in data presented in a variety of forms to problem solve and analyze data.

D

 

Note cause/effect relationship and draw inferences from a variety of data to problem solve and analyze data.

D

 

Read critically a variety of materials including textbooks, historical documents, newspapers, magazines, and other reference sources for historical awareness.

D

 

Construct and analyze timelines for historical awareness.

D

 

Utilize community resources such as field trips, guest speakers, and museums for historical awareness.

D

 

Incorporate the use of technological resources for historical awareness.

D

 

Utilize primary and secondary source material such as biographies and autobiographies; novels; speeches and letters; and poetry, songs, and artwork for historical awareness.

top

 

Eighth Grade

Sixth | Seventh | Eighth | Civil War | Ancient History

Secondary Resources

A Blueprint for Learning - Social Studies

 

CULTURE

Culture encompasses similarities and differences among people, including their beliefs, knowledge, changes, values, and tradition. Student will explore these elements of society to develop an appreciation of human cultures.

 


 

Key

Reporting

Category

 

D

 

Explain how people living in the same region maintain different ways of life.

D

 

Analyze how human migration and cultural activities influence the character of a place.

Pictures from various cultures around the world

D

 

Discuss the development of major religions.

D

 

Define religion.

D

 

Describe the beliefs of America’s major religions and religious organizations.

American Religion History

D

 

Describe how religion contributed to the growth of representative government in the American colonies.

M

 

Identify the role diverse cultures had on the development of the Americas.

M

 

List the various cultures that contributed to the development of the United States.

M

 

Identify and examine perspectives of various cultural groups within early American history.

D

 

Identify specific technological innovations and their uses.

D

 

Construct a timeline of technological innovations and rate their relative importance on culture.

 

ECONOMICS

Globalization of the economy, the explosion of population growth, technological changes and international competition compels the student to understand, both personally and globally, production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services. The student will examine and analyze economic concepts such as basic needs versus wants, using versus saving money, and policy-making versus decision-making.

I

 

Describe the role that supply and demand, prices, incentives, and profits play in determining what is produced and distributed in a competitive market system.

Primary Source Documents

Oil & Natural Gas Resources

D

 

Describe the differences within economic theories such as mercantilism and capitalism.

A

E

Recognize America's natural resources (i.e., land, timber, fish, animal pelts, peppers, sweet potatoes, squash, pumpkins, turkeys, peanuts, potatoes, tomatoes, tobacco, cacao, beans, and vanilla). History of squash, Native American Agriculture ,   History of tobacco Fur trade, History of turkeys, History of peanuts, History of the potato, History of chocolate, , History of pumpkins, History of sweet potato

Natural Resources Conservation

A

E

Interpret a diagram showing the steps of changing a resource into a product. Cotton Gin

D

 

List the major industrial and agricultural products of Tennessee and the United States.

D

 

Describe a range of examples of the various institutions that make up economic systems such as households, business firms, banks, government agencies, labor unions, and corporations.

M

 

Analyze the impact of economic phenomena within the free enterprise system such as supply and demand, profit, government regulation, and world competition on the economy of Tennessee and Early America.

D

 

Define various types of economies and their methods of production and consumption.

D

 

Apply economic concepts to evaluate historic and contemporary developments.

D

 

Explain the economic impact of improved communication and transportation on the world economy.

D

 

Analyze the impact of national and international markets and events on the production of goods and services in Tennessee and Early America.

M

 

Define microeconomic terms such as credit, debt, goods, services, domestic products, imports, and exports.

Dynamics of Business and Economics

D

 

Analyze how supply and demand and change in technologies impact the cost for goods and services.

A

E

Differentiate between credit and debt.

D

 

Evaluate the relationship between creditors and debtors.

D

 

Explain and illustrate how values and beliefs influence different economic decisions related to needs and wants.

A

E

Differentiate between a commercial and subsistence economy.

D

 

Define macroeconomic terms such as economic alignments, credit, market economy, tariffs, closed economies, and emerging markets.

D

 

Generalize and evaluate the process of governmental taxation on individuals and businesses.

A

E

Identify various forms of taxation (i.e., tariffs, sales tax, and excise tax).

D

 

Evaluate the domestic and international impact of various economic agreements.

D

 

Compare basic economic systems according to who determines what is produced, distributed, and consumed.

A

E

Interpret a variety of economic graphs and charts with topics (e.g., the Columbian exchange, numbers of slaves, population of colonies, and population diversity).

Slavery

Number of People in Agriculture 1880

D

 

Explain economic factors that led to the urbanization of Tennessee and Early America.

D

 

Trace the development of major industries that contributed to the urbanization of Tennessee and Early America.

A

E

Recognize the economic activities of Early America (i.e., agriculture, industry, and service).

Primary Source Documents

Number of People in Agriculture 1800

Types and Numbers of Professions 1800

D

 

Explain the changes in types of jobs and occupations that resulted from the urbanization of Tennessee and Early America.

A

E

Recognize the factors that led to urbanization and industrialization in Early America (i.e., religious freedom, land ownership, and thriving market).

A

E

Distinguish among various economic markets found in Early America (i.e., traditional, monopoly, oligopoly, and free competition).

Economic Markets

 

GEOGRAPHY

Geography enables the student to see, understand and appreciate the web of relationships between people, places, and environments. The student will use the knowledge, skills, and understanding of concepts within the six essential elements of geography: world in spatial terms, places and regions, physical systems, human systems, environment and society, and the use of geography. 

M

 

Locate major countries and regions of the world on a map or globe focusing on those countries and regions that relate to the development of North America.

A

G

Identify and use the key geographic elements on maps (i.e., island, flood plain, swamp, delta, marsh, harbor, cape, sea level, bay, prairie, desert, oasis, mesa, mountain, valley, glacier, canyon, cliff, and plateau).

Pictures of various landforms

North American River Basins

North American Landforms

North American Landforms by Satellite

A

G

Use various geographic data from maps and globes to determine longitude, latitude, distance, and direction.

A

G

Recognize how topographical features such as mountain and river systems influenced the settlement and expansion of the United States (i.e., Cumberland Gap, Wilderness Road, and Ohio and Tennessee river systems).

Population Density and Landforms

M

 

Identify the routes of contact between the Americas and Europe, Asia, and Africa.

A

G

Interpret a geographic map of the early United States.

Chesapeake Bay

United States 1800

United States 1821 Northwest Territory

D

 

Illustrate the geographic exchange of ideas, materials, and goods between the Americas and the rest of the world prior to the Civil War.

A

G

Recognize the definition of religion.

M

 

Identify major landforms, bodies of water, cities, and states.

Population Density and Landforms

D

 

Identify the physical, economic, and cultural regions of the United States.

Production of Hay, Tobacco and Cotton 1800

M

 

Explain the factors that contribute to the placement of cities and boundaries.

M

 

Explain how physical features such as major river and mountain systems affected the development of early Native American and early European settlements.

A

G

Interpret examples which illustrate how cultures adapt to or change the environment (i.e., deforestation, subsistence farming, cash crop, and dam and road building).

D

 

Explain how environmental factors influenced the way of life of the various peoples of the Americas.

D

 

Describe how geographic features affected the development of transportation and communication networks.

D

 

Explain the influences of geographic features both physical and human on historical events.

Regions & Economic Activities

D

 

Explain how physical processes shape the United States’ features and patterns.

D

 

Understand the differences in population characteristics of the United States such as density, distribution, and growth rates.

United States Population Growth 1790-1880

D

 

Explain how processes of migration affected development of settlements in the United States.

M

 

Explain how environmental issues such as water supply and resource availability influenced settlement patterns.

D

 

List the causes of migration and immigration.

A

G

Interpret a chart or map of population characteristics of the early United States (i.e., density, distribution, and regional growth).

African American Population 1883

Foreign Population 1883

A

G

 Recognize how immigration and cultural diffusion have influenced the character of a place (i.e., religion within certain colonies, African songs in the American south, and British vs. French influences).

D

 

Discuss the economic and social impact of immigration and migration on a region or country.

D

 

Categorize causes of migration and immigration into "push and pull" factors.

 

GOVERNANCE AND CIVICS

Governance establishes structures of power and authority in order to provide order and stability. Civic efficacy requires understanding rights and responsibilities, ethical behavior, and the role of citizens within their community, nation, and world.

D

 

Analyze the necessity of establishing and enforcing the rule of law.

D

 

Analyze and explain ideas and governmental mechanisms to meet needs and wants of citizens, regulate territory, manage conflict, and establish order and security.

D

 

Explain and apply concepts such as power, role, status, justice, and influence to the examination of persistent issues and social problems.

D

 

Describe the purpose of government and how its powers are acquired, used, and justified.

D

 

Distinguish basic differences between democracy and other forms of government in other regions of the world.

D

 

Identify and explain the roles of formal and informal political actors in influencing and shaping public policy and decision-making.

D

 

Analyze the influence of diverse forms of public opinion on the development of public policy and decision-making.

D

 

Relate a people’s location, population, production and consumption to the function of their government.

D

 

Identify models of lower to higher forms of political order.

D

 

Describe the ways nations and organizations respond to forces of unity and diversity affecting order and security.

D

 

Differentiate between rights and privileges of the individual.

D

 

Consider how cooperation and conflict affect the dissemination of resources, rights, and privileges.

D

 

Explain conditions, actions, and motivations that contribute to conflict and cooperation within and among states, regions, and nations.

D

 

Describe and analyze the role advancements in technology have played in conflict resolution.

D

 

Define the differences between the individual and the state.

D

 

Identify and interpret sources and examples of the rights and responsibilities of citizens.

Slavery

D

 

Describe the importance of individual rights, such as free speech and press, in a democratic society.

A

GC

Recognize the rights and responsibilities of individuals throughout the development of the United States.

Constitution/Citizenship Test

Push for Reform

D

 

Evaluate the role of government in balancing the rights of individuals versus the common good.

Bill of Rights Power Point

A

GC

Identify the rights, responsibilities, and privileges of a member of the United States of America (i.e., Declaration of Independence, Articles of Confederation, Constitution, and Bill of Rights).

Articles of Confederation

Articles of Confederation

Constitution/Jeopardy Game

A

GC

Identify the purposes and structures of various systems of governance (i.e., Federalism, Confederation, Republic, Democracy, Executive, Legislative, and Judicial).

Federalism

 Constitution Terms

Federalism

Legislative Branch

Legislative Branch

Constitution Flow Chart

A

GC

Recognize the purpose of government and how its powers are acquired, used, and justified.

Branches of Government

Constitution

D

 

Identify and describe the basic features of the political system in the early United States, and identify representative leaders from various levels and branches of government.

Government Leaders

Constitution Convention Leaders

A

GC

Identify how conditions, actions, and motivations contributed to conflict and cooperation between states, regions, and nations.

Constitutional Convention

Bill of Rights Power Point

 

D

 

Analyze the effectiveness of selected public policies and citizen behaviors in realizing the stated ideals of a democratic republican form of government.

D

 

Explain how the Constitution is applied in every day life.

A

GC

Recognize the rights guaranteed in the Bill of Rights.

D

 

Apply the Constitution to individual court cases.

A

GC

Recognize the impact of major court decisions have had on American life, (i.e., Marbury vs. Madison, McCulloch vs. Maryland, and Dred Scott vs. Sandford). Dred Scott

Marbury/Madison Power Point

Dred Scott

D

 

Analyze the United States Constitution in principle and practice.

Slavery

D

 

Compare and contrast the ways the Constitution balances the "individual" versus the "state."

D

 

Identify how the Tennessee Constitution reflects the principles represented in the Constitution.

D

 

Identify the influences of ideas from the United States Constitution on the Tennessee Constitution.

D

 

Identify civic responsibilities of Tennessee and United States citizens.

D

 

Describe the structure and functions of government at municipal, county, and state levels.

D

 

Identify how the different points of view of political parties and interest groups have affected important Tennessee and national issues.

D

 

Analyze the contributions of Tennessee political leaders within the national scene.

A

GC

Identify the role of institutions in furthering both continuity and change (i.e., governments, churches, families, schools, and communities).

Churches

Schools

A

GC

Recognize how groups and institutions work together to meet common needs.

Red Cross

Red Cross

A

GC

Recognize how a right must be interpreted to balance individual rights with the need for order (i.e., freedom of speech, freedom of religion, and trial by jury).

Bill of Rights Power Point

Freedom of Religion

 

HISTORY

History involves people, events, and issues. The student will evaluate evidence to develop comparative and causal analyses, and to interpret primary sources. He/she will construct sound historical arguments and perspectives on which informed decisions in contemporary life can be based.

* Some state performance indicators are listed in more than one era. These may be assessed in any of the eras in which they appear, but not necessarily in all eras in which they appear.

Era 1 - Three Worlds Meet (Beginnings to 1620)

D

 

Identify the ancient civilizations in the Americas.

D

 

Explain the cultures of the Western Hemisphere’s native peoples prior to European contact.

D

 

Evaluate the expanding intercontinental exchange and the conflicts brought on by exploration and colonization.

D

 

Describe the role religion played in Western Europe, during the age of exploration, with respect to subsequent crusading tradition and overseas exploration.

D

 

Explain the ways geographic, technological, and scientific factors contributed to the European age of exploration and settlement in the Americas.

D

 

Describe the immediate and long-term impact early European exploration had on native populations and on colonization in the Americas.

D

 

List the characteristics of the Spanish and Portuguese exploration and conquest of the Americas.

D

 

Recognize that the English, Spanish, Portuguese, and French differed from one another in their views regarding economy, property, and religion, and this influenced the way the different cultures colonized.

D

 

Identify and use key concepts such as chronology, causality, change, conflict, and complexity to explain, analyze, and show connections among patterns of historical change and continuity.

D

 

Explain the geological factors that led to the geographic features of Tennessee.

D

 

Describe pre-Columbian Native American peoples and their societies.

Mayan Pictures

Aztec Pictures

Inca Pictures

D

 

List the early European explorers and their nations of origin.

*A

USP 1, 2

Read a timeline and order events of the past.

Americas 500-1500 – events, people, art, discoveries

*A

USP 1, 2

Recognize the causes and examples of migration and immigration in early America (i.e., land, religion, money, pioneer spirit, indentured servitude, displacement, and slavery).

Slavery and Great Britain

*A

USP 1, 2

Differentiate between a primary and secondary source.

*A

USP 1, 2

Identify how religion contributed to early American society (e.g., impact on government, education, social norms, slavery, and tolerance).

*A

USP 1, 2

Interpret a timeline of technological innovations

American Technology timeline 

*A

USP 1, 2

Classify the characteristics of major historic events into causes and effects (i.e., exploration, colonization, revolution, expansion, and Civil War).

Slavery and Great Britain

*A

USP 1, 2

Identify conclusions about historical events using primary and secondary sources.

*A

USP 1, 2

Differentiate between primary and secondary source documents.

Slavery and Great Britain

*A

USP 1

Recognize the influence of science and technology on the development of early American colonial cultures (i.e., compass, shipbuilding, food storage, printing press, financial markets, weaponry, and transportation).

Innovations 1400-1700

*A

USP 1

Contrast the characteristics of major native civilizations of the Americas.

*A

USP 1

Compare and contrast the tenets of America’s early major religions (i.e., Olmec beliefs, Native American Earth/Mother spirit, African Traditional Religion, Puritanism, and Quakerism).

*A

USP 1

Recognize the historical impacts of European settlement in North America.

Era 2 - Colonization and Settlement (1585-1763)

 

D

 

Discuss the search for religious, economic, and individual freedom in the settlement of the colonies.

American Religion

D

 

Classify various limits on individual freedom in Colonial America.

D

 

Describe the lives of free and indentured immigrants from Europe who came to North America and the Caribbean.

D

 

Recognize the contributions of European philosophers which influenced the religious and political aspects of colonial America as to how individuals contributed to participatory government, challenged inherited ideas of hierarchy, and affected the ideal of community.

D

 

Explain how the evolution of English political practice impacted the colonists’ sense of freedom.

D

 

Detail the growth and change in the European colonies during the two centuries following their founding with an emphasis on New England and Virginia.

D

 

Explain the differences and similarities among the English, French, and Spanish settlements.

D

 

Recognize the cultural and environmental impacts of European settlement in North America.

D

 

Evaluate the importance of the Mayflower Compact, the Fundamental Orders of Connecticut, and the Virginia House of Burgesses to the growth of representative government.

D

 

Recognize the shift from utilizing indentured servitude to slavery within the colonies due to economic reasons and popular uprisings.

D

 

Read and analyze a primary source document such as diaries, letters, and contracts.

D

 

Recognize how family and gender roles of different regions of Colonial America changed across time.

D

 

Recognize that the economic systems employed in the Northern colonies differed from those of the Southern colonies.

D

 

Explain how the Declaration of Independence conflicts with the institution of chattel slavery.

D

 

Describe the contributions of free and enslaved blacks in United States history.

D

 

Identify Tennessee’s natural resources.

D

 

Discuss how the Proclamation Line did not deter western expansion of colonials.

D

 

Explain the significance of the Cumberland Gap in Tennessee history.

*A

USP 1, 2

Read a timeline and order events of the past.

*A

USP 1, 2

Recognize the causes and examples of migration and immigration in early America (i.e., land, religion, money, pioneer spirit, indentured servitude, displacement, and slavery).

Immigration

*A

USP 1, 2

Differentiate between a primary and secondary source.

*A

USP 1, 2

Recognize causes and consequences of conflict, (i.e., French and Indian War, Revolutionary War, and War of 1812).

*A

USP 1, 2

Identify how religion contributed to early American society (e.g., impact on government, education, social norms, slavery, and tolerance).    America’s first school     Opposition to slavery

*A

USP 1, 2

Interpret a timeline of technological innovations.

American Technology timeline

*A

USP 1, 2

Classify the characteristics of major historic events into causes and effects (i.e., exploration, colonization, revolution, expansion, and Civil War).

*A

USP 1, 2

Identify conclusions about historical events using primary and secondary sources.

*A

USP 1, 2

Differentiate between primary and secondary source documents.

*A

USP 1, 2

Analyze in economic terms (i.e., climate, triangle trade, infrastructure, and topography) why slavery flourished in the South as opposed to the North.

South and Slavery

*A

USP 1

Recognize the influence of science and technology on the development of early American colonial cultures (i.e., compass, shipbuilding, food storage, printing press, financial markets, weaponry, and transportation).

*A

USP 1

Contrast the characteristics of major native civilizations of the Americas.

*A

USP 1

Compare and contrast the tenets of America’s early major religions (i.e., Olmec beliefs, Native American Earth/Mother spirit, African Traditional Religion, Puritanism, and Quakerism).

*A

USP 1

Recognize the historical impacts of European settlement in North America.

 

Era 3 - Revolution and the New Nation (1754-1820)

Pictures of Revolutionary War Re-enactment

M

 

Explain the events that contributed to the outbreak of the American Revolution such as leaders who resisted imperial policy, the English tax on colonists from the Seven Years’ War, divergent economic interests, and regional motivations.

M

 

Know the Declaration of Independence, its major ideas, and its sources.

M

 

Describe the armed conflict of the Revolutionary War.

M

 

Explain the roles played by significant individuals during the American Revolution and their independence, which led to the creation of the Articles of Confederation.

Revolutionary Men

M

 

Explain the economic issues addressed by the Continental Congress and its subsequent successes and failures.

D

 

Recognize the debate over the necessity of the Bill of Rights.

D

 

Explain the factors and results of Shay’s Rebellion.

D

 

Analyze documents such as the Declaration of Independence, the Federalist Papers, the United States Constitution, and the Bill of Rights.

D

 

Explain the differing perspectives and roles played in the American Revolution by various groups of people.

M

 

Describe the events that led to the creation and the failure of the state of Franklin.

M

 

Examine the expansion of settlers into Tennessee.

M

 

Discuss the entry of Tennessee into the Union.

*A

USP 1, 2

Read a timeline and order events of the past.

*A

USP 1, 2

Recognize the causes and examples of migration and immigration in early America (i.e., land, religion, money, pioneer spirit, indentured servitude, displacement, and slavery).

Slavery power point

*A

USP 1, 2

Differentiate between a primary and secondary source.

*A

USP 1, 2

Recognize causes and consequences of conflict, (i.e., French and Indian War, Revolutionary War, and War of 1812).

*A

USP 1, 2

Identify how religion contributed to early American society (e.g., impact on government, education, social norms, slavery, and tolerance).

*A

USP 1, 2

Interpret a timeline of technological innovations.

American Technology timeline

*A

USP 1, 2

Classify the characteristics of major historic events into causes and effects (i.e., exploration, colonization, revolution, expansion, and Civil War).

*A

USP 1, 2

Identify conclusions about historical events using primary and secondary sources.

Martha Ballard’s Diary 1785-1812

*A

USP 1, 2

Differentiate between primary and secondary source documents.

*A

USP 1, 2

Analyze in economic terms (i.e., climate, triangle trade, infrastructure, and topography) why slavery flourished in the South as opposed to the North.

*A

USP 2

Recognize the course of conflicts including major battles, alliances, strategy, leadership, resources, or technology using a diagram for the Revolutionary War.

*A

USP 1

Recognize the influence of science and technology on the development of early American colonial cultures (i.e., compass, shipbuilding, food storage, printing press, financial markets, weaponry, and transportation).

Native American Pictures

*A

USP 1

Contrast the characteristics of major native civilizations of the Americas.

Mayan Pictures

Aztec Pictures

Inca Pictures

*A

USP 1

Compare and contrast the tenets of America’s early major religions (i.e., Olmec beliefs, Native American Earth/Mother spirit, African Traditional Religion, Puritanism, and Quakerism).

*A

USP 1

Recognize the historical impacts of European settlement in North America.

 

Era 4 - Expansion and Reform (1801-1861)

 

D

 

Give examples of maps, timelines, and charts that show western expansion.

D

 

Identify the factors that led to territorial expansion and its effects.

D

 

Explain the short and long term political and cultural impacts of the Louisiana Purchase.

D

 

Recognize the significance of the Lewis and Clark expedition.

D

 

Describe the Monroe Doctrine and its foreign policy goals.

D

 

Describe the causes, sectional divisions, and Native American support for the British and results of the War of 1812.

D

 

Discuss sectional differences brought on by the Western movement, expansion of slavery, and emerging industrialization.

D

 

Illustrate the demographics brought on by the Western movement, expansion of slavery, emerging industrialization and consequences for Native American groups.

D

 

Consider the social and political impact of the theory of Manifest Destiny.

D

 

Analyze governmental policy in response to sectional differences.

D

 

Explain the events that led to the Mexican-American War and the consequences of the Treaty of Guadeloupe-Hidalgo.

D

 

Describe the political impact of adding new states to the Union.

D

 

Define the concept of reform.

D

 

Identify reform movements of early1800’s.

D

 

Describe the lives of immigrants in American society during the antebellum period and how this led to a rationale for reform movement.

D

 

Discuss the growth of Tennessee’s cities and regions.

D

 

Evaluate the differences among Tennessee’s three grand divisions.

D

 

Study the impact on Tennessee’s history made by individuals.

D

 

Examine the events that led to the systematic removal of Native Americans within Tennessee and the subsequent Trail of Tears.

D

 

Recognize Tennessee’s influence in the country’s westward expansion.

*A

USP 1, 2

Read a timeline and order events of the past.

Timeline of American history

*A

USP 1, 2

Recognize the causes and examples of migration and immigration in early America (i.e., land, religion, money, pioneer spirit, indentured servitude, displacement, and slavery).

Homesteaders World  Gold rush    Mormons  Trail of Tears  African American Migration German Immigration

*A

USP 1, 2

Differentiate between a primary and secondary source.

General primary source documents

*A

USP 1, 2

Recognize causes and consequences of conflict, (i.e., French and Indian War, Revolutionary War, and War of 1812).

War of 1812

*A

USP 1, 2

Identify how religion contributed to early American society (e.g., impact on government, education, social norms, slavery, and tolerance). 

Christianity in America    

 Justification for slavery based on religion  

Christian opposition to slavery 

 Christian churches’ view of family

Religion and Newspapers

Religion and Government

Religion and Slavery

 

*A

USP 1, 2

Interpret a timeline of technological innovations.

American Technology Timeline

*A

USP 1, 2

Classify the characteristics of major historic events into causes and effects (i.e., exploration, colonization, revolution, expansion, and Civil War). 

Missouri compromise

Westward expansion power point

Jefferson Era Changes

*A

USP 1, 2

Identify conclusions about historical events using primary and secondary sources. Mexican War source documents, Letter to Meriwether Lewis from Thomas Jefferson, view source documents  John Ross letter to congress

*A

USP 1, 2

Differentiate between primary and secondary source documents.

Differences between sources

*A

USP 1, 2

Analyze in economic terms (i.e., climate, triangle trade, infrastructure, and topography) why slavery flourished in the South as opposed to the North. Economics of slavery

*A

USP 2

Identify cultures that contributed to the development of the United States (i.e., Native American, African, British, Scottish, Irish, and German). Irish Immigration , Scottish Immigration

*A

USP 2

Recognize consequences of the westward expansion of the United States. Westward Expansion

*A

USP 2

Identify the impact of individual and group decisions on historical events. Trail of Tears

*A

USP 2

Recognize the impact groups have on change at the local, state, national, and world levels. Abolitionist mountain men, 49ers

*A

USP 2

Determine the social, political, and economic factors that contribute to the institution of slavery in America.

Slavery in America

Slavery

*A

USP 2

Interpret a timeline, detailing the development of political parties in the United States to the Civil War. Timeline of Political Parties

*A

USP 2

Interpret maps, timelines, and charts that illustrate key elements of history (i.e., expansion, economics, politics, and society). Slavery and westward expansion

*A

USP 2

Recognize examples of stereotyping, prejudice, conformity, and altruism in Early American history. Stereotyping, underground railroad,

*A

USP 2

Analyze the contributions of Tennessee political leaders on the national scene (e.g., Andrew Jackson, Andrew Johnson, James K .Polk, Sequoyah, and Sam Houston) Jackson biography  

Polk power point

Sequoyah biography

Houston biography

Jackson

Jackson Era

*A

USP 2

Examine the demographic changes brought about by westward movement (i.e., slavery, industrialization, and Native American relocation).  African American migration   Railroad maps

*A

USP 2

Recognize the course of conflicts including major battles, alliances, strategy, leadership, resources, or technology using a diagram for the Revolutionary War.

 

Era 5 - Civil War and Reconstruction (1850-1877)

 

D

 

Identify sectional differences that led to the Civil War.

D

 

Chart the course of major events throughout the Civil War.

D

 

Explain the technological, social, and strategic aspects of the Civil War.

D

 

Weigh political, social, and economic impact of the Civil War on the different regions of the United States.

D

 

Understand that different scholars may describe the same event or situation in different ways.

D

 

Recognize the economic impact of African-American labor on the United States economy.

D

 

Analyze the social and cultural impact of African-Americans on American society.

*A

USP1 ,2

Read a timeline and order events of the past.

*A

USP 1, 2

Recognize the causes and examples of migration and immigration in early America (i.e., land, religion, money, pioneer spirit, indentured servitude, displacement, and slavery).

*A

USP 1, 2

Differentiate between a primary and secondary source.

*A

USP 1, 2

Recognize causes and consequences of conflict, (i.e., French and Indian War, Revolutionary War, and War of 1812).

*A

USP 1, 2

Identify how religion contributed to early American society (e.g., impact on government, education, social norms, slavery, and tolerance).

*A

USP 1, 2

Interpret a timeline of technological innovations.  American Technology timeline

 

 

*A

USP 1, 2

Classify the characteristics of major historic events into causes and effects (i.e., exploration, colonization, revolution, expansion, and Civil War).

Causes of the Civil War

*A

USP 1, 2

Identify conclusions about historical events using primary and secondary sources.

*A

USP 1, 2

Differentiate between primary and secondary source documents.

*A

USP 1, 2

Analyze in economic terms (i.e., climate, triangle trade, infrastructure, and topography) why slavery flourished in the South as opposed to the North.

*A

USP 2

Identify cultures that contributed to the development of the United States (i.e., Native American, African, British, Scottish, Irish, and German).

*A

USP 2

Recognize consequences of the westward expansion of the United States.

*A

USP 2

Identify the impact of individual and group decisions on historical events.

*A

USP 2

Recognize the impact groups have on change at the local, state, national, and world levels.

*A

USP 2

Determine the social, political, and economic factors that contribute to the institution of slavery in America.

*A

USP 2

Interpret a timeline, detailing the development of political parties in the United States to the Civil War.

*A

USP 2

Interpret maps, timelines, and charts that illustrate key elements of history (i.e., expansion, economics, politics, and society).

United States 1816 (Territory/States)

Free, Secession and Other States (Civil War Battle Maps)

*A

USP 2

Recognize examples of stereotyping, prejudice, conformity, and altruism in Early American history.

*A

USP 2

Analyze the contributions of Tennessee political leaders on the national scene (e.g., Andrew Jackson, Andrew Johnson, James K .Polk, Sequoyah, and Sam Houston).

*A

USP 2

Examine the demographic changes brought about by westward movement (i.e., slavery, industrialization, and Native American relocation).

*A

USP 2

Recognize the course of conflicts including major battles, alliances, strategy, leadership, resources, or technology using a diagram for the Revolutionary War.

 

INDIVIDUALS, GROUPS, AND INTERACTIONS

 

 Personal development and identity are shaped by factors including culture, groups, and institutions. Central to this development are exploration, identification, and analysis of how individuals and groups work independently and cooperatively.

 

D

 

Examine persistent issues involving the rights, roles, and status of the individual in relation to the general welfare.

I

 

Identify and interpret examples of stereotyping, conformity, and altruism.

I

 

Identify and analyze examples of tension between expression of individuality and group or institutional efforts to promote social conformity.

D

 

Describe the role of institutions in furthering both continuity and change.